Hot Topic : Who’s got a problem with hijab?

by WE LOVE HIJAB · 245 comments

Do hijabis or non-hijabis have more problems with hijabs?

A reader on Muslimette.com left an interesting comment today, which reads:

“You’re right – non-muslims don’t have much problem with the hijab. It’s muslim girls and women who are ‘ashamed’ of it in a way. To some people, wearing a hijab is akin to slumming it, like not living up to what life is offering. But we have to face it – this life here is just a transition spot for the true believing Muslim. Sad and such a shame they cannot realize that…” -Z.

I have been wearing hijab since I was about 12 or 13 years-old and I can honestly say that I’ve heard more negative comments about it from Muslim women than from non-Muslims. None of these women actually wore the hijab and their reasons for not doing so range from “the hijab makes my hair fall out” to “I will start wearing hijabs once I’m out of college”… I wouldn’t say that I’ve heard a lot of these comments, but I’ve heard enough of them. On the other hand, I’ve only heard one or two negative comments about hijab from non-Muslims in my entire life (not counting the stupid things that a few people have said in my blog comments).


What about you? Do you agree or disagree with Z’s statement? Have you encountered more Muslim women who dislike the hijab or more non-Muslims who have a problem with it? If possible, please let us know what country you live in so that we can get a feel for what it’s like in different parts of the world.


Image Credit – kamshots

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{ 245 comments… read them below or add one }

mira

I agree that it comes from Muslim women more than non muslim women. My own extended family makes it difficult for me to be pious because they give me such a hard time about everything.

However, I will say this. Wearing hijab takes a lot of strength and guts to wear in todays world. Especially if you live in a Western non muslim country. I dont think we should put down the girls who dont wear it, just like those who dont wear it shouldnt put down the ones who do. We must always remember that Allah swt is the judge of human beings, not us. We must do what we must and what we can to be the best muslims we can be and pray for those who struggle or have fallen away from the right path.

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WE LOVE HIJAB

@mira : I definitely agree that we shouldn’t put down Muslim women who do not wear the hijab. Allah knows best what their reasons are. I hope this post doesn’t come off as a bash on non-hijabis. That’s not the intention of it. I’m just interested in knowing what you all think about this topic.

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pumpmar

well lets see i am non muslim living in the southeast part of the usa. my family has a problem with hijab, and it actually embarrasses me when im in a store with my mom and she will point at some1 who is wearing it and say (in a really high voice) something about the person in hijab…actually i like it, i get alot of my clothing ideas from hijab websites, and i dont see women wearing hijab as any different from someone wearing a wig or hat or anything on their head :)

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mira

Oh definitely not. Your article is very well written, it did not come off as bashing anyone at all. No worries!

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Deniz

I live in Sydney, Australia and i agree with you; more Muslims dislike or disapprove of the hijab than do non-Muslims. i think this could be because of the whole “we live in Australia; we’re more modern than that” comment. At least thats the comments i received/receive from my parents when i put the scarf on 3 months ago! Before i covered i had mentioned it in conversation to my parents and my dad said that if i want to cover i should ‘move to a country like Saudi Arabia’. But that fact is that most Australians are accepting of the hijab because that is just the attitude down here, people are carefree in a way that allows them to accept whatever you wear and whatever reasons you wear them for, mashallah. But some of the Muslims (especially those who migrated here 30 odd years ago) are so eager to become Australians that they have lost themselves and turned around to attack their own. Of course, as i mentioned i have only began wearing the hijab 3 months ago so i am yet to see the reactions and feedback from society.

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Samira

ASA-

I think it all depends on what your day to day life is and as you mentioned the culture that you live in-For instance, living in the Philadelphia area people are aware of the large Muslim population particularly the large number of BAMs (Black American Muslims) that are in this area. Many sisters in this area wear hijab & for this reason I think there is less resistance among the Muslim population within the AfAm community. Hijab is not necessarily associated with being poor or uneducated as it is among upwardly mobile Arabs or South Asians in my humble opinion. Cities also tend to grant a level of anonymity b/c people pretty much mind there biz.

At the same time wearing hijab can be a very stressful experience outside of the community. Especially if you are persuing fast track careers or entering fields that are hostile towards the visible expression of religion. I’ve talked with a number of working and professional Muslimahs & the experience of stares, hostility and aggression b/c of wearing the hijab is felt all around. I can speak from personal experience when I say that other Muslims (non-hijabis and hijabis, men & women) are the least of my problems.

I actually have been greeted by non-hijabis sisters more readily than other hijabis (interesting, right???) but I think this is matter of racial/cultural prejudice, lack of Islamic knowledge & adab & snobbery. Allah knows best.

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Fayrouz

I have to agree because I was one of them until I wore the hijab. I had a list of reasons from ‘someone will do something to me’…’it’ll be too hot’…’i'll have no friends’… ‘i’m too young…’ But when I did wear it, I was glad I did. A lot of girls wear the hijab today not b/c they agree with it, but b/c they stick out WITHOUT it among their family and other Muslim friends. it has become a way to hide the bad in your body (ex. moles, hair, fat…) and look…”good.” some muslim girls feel “dumb” running with a scarf in gym class or going to the pool…

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Khouloude

I live in France , and I agree with you . As you know, hijab is forbidden in schools, and most of french people doesn’t really understand what hijab is. A lot of people came to ask me whether I was forced by my parents or I decided to wear it alone ; but once I explain why I wear my hijab they respect me and sometimes more than some muslim I know .
So I really think that it’s muslims who has a problem with hijab and not non-muslims.

PS : I’m sorry if there are a lot of mistakes but I’ve always lived in France so my English isn’t that good :S

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fajar

u live in france,bt the cmnts which non_muslims givs to hijaba varies frm country to country,like in USA,, non_muslims condenm it

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Sehar

Modesty is an attitude. I cover my head when I feel like it, but I do not wear the traditional scarf hijab style. There are so many other head coverings which suit me better. I have been called every name in the book, had people give me a wide space walking on the mall, dirty looks etc. by Caucasians mostly. It is their fear of Muslims like those who fear African American men. I dress modestly stylishly because my body is my business. I do not dress to advertise my religion in particular. Everyone should dress for their own comfort level, not judge others, let everyone have their opinion and I thank sites like this for their suggestions on dressing modestly.

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Naemah

I would have to agree. I get more comments from other muslimah’s that don’t cover, particularly my family. I grew up in Buffalo NY. I used to be one of them that disliked the hijab cause I thought it was unnecessary and represented oppression. That is basically what I have gotten from my family since I decided to cover. I think many who do not ( speaking from my own personal experience) did not want to stand out and instead integrate more into American life. But wearing hijab was one of the best decisions in my life. I’m proud and not embarrased at all to wear it. As a matter of fact I am the only hijabi when I work out at dance class!

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um mautez

im from palestine and i dont agree with z’s statement i have been wearing the hijjab since i was 17 and now im 28 and i would have to say that i have never heard bad comments about the hijjab from muslim woman but i have heard relaly stupid reasons for mulim woman not to wear it just really stupid excuses for example like when im dont with college i will wear it or when i get ingadged or married. i believe the only reason muslim woman dont wear the hijjab is because they want to show off their beauty and that they feel that they have no beauty once they wear the hijjab. many people may not agrre with me but when they sit down and really think about it and ask themselves what is really stopping them from wearing the hijjab there is none other than themselves.

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Inal

I’ve worn hijab since before taking Shahada, as a means to prepare myself for all the feelings, emotional responses, and to better understand what I was getting into- after so many years hijab has become part of my psyche. I can say wearing hijab during various points in my life has made it easy in some cases and extremely hard in others. The hard ones being where sisters have criticized me for either wearing it or not wearing to their particular specifications.

Non muslims have only asked post 9/11; muslims for as long as I’ve been muslim- and this is interesting because they hear an American accent and immediately ask if I’m truly a muslim; as if American Muslims wouldn’t do that- one man after asking stated he was confused because he’s seen non muslims wearing hats and bandanas: my response was why would a non muslim commit to wearing hijab full time (all seasons, places) if it were not for the love of Allah SWT? He thought about and said “no reason if not muslim”. And I nodded and walked away. He would later apologize saying he had been rude.

This may indicate better then what some may think of hijab- some thinking it belongs only to/in a particular country or culture and not to any muslim regardless of origin. And in believing they have ownership they may feel converts (in my case) don’t have a right to it unless its under their control.

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carol

i live in madrid spain, the people here are so open minded with such a kind of things in fact there are a lots of musulmans living in here and all of the muslimah i know here wears hiyab

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aisha

yes i definately feel that non-muslims have less of a problem with hijaab than muslims
who dont wear it. ive been wearing an abaya and hijaab since i was 13 and soooo many muslims always think my parents made me wear them or think i shouldnt wear it.
whereas non muslims in my school are alot more accepting and ive never felt that any of them have a problem with it. however muslims who put it down make non-muslims believe that its a sign of oppression when they put it down and thats what really annoys me

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chocolatte

I have been wearing hijab since I was 12 and I did recieve some negative comments. Since my mother also wears hijab (alhumdulilah) it was thought that she “forced” me to wear it.But I think the real issue is education. Once you know why you are supposed to wear it and the benefits that you get from Allah swt then a lot of these issues can be solved. A lot of non muslins were curious and asked a lot of questions, once they got the answer it made sense to them and they actually really liked the idea of hijab. So I think when one understands the reason for doing certain things then being judgmental doesn’t usually become an issue in that situation.

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JENNIFER

WELL STATED- ALLAH KNOWS BEST (YA ALIM AND YA HAKIM)- IT IS WAJIB TO WEAR HIJAB AS STATED IN SURAH NUR AND SURAH AHZAB IN THE HOLY QURAN-

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Samira

ASA sisters,

I think what is interesting is the extent to which Muslims b/c of systematic prejudice internalize those fears & begin to police hijabis. For instance, one sister here mentioned France who has through legislation banned hijab & now niquab (basically criminalizing Muslim religious symbols) yet she still feels as if the Muslims are worse @ hijabi hatred. But it is important to remember that these Muslims are made to feel like everything about Islam is inferior. That they will never fit into the “civilized” culture without conforming. And the truth is that they are not hired for jobs, actively discriminated again and forced into poor neighborhoods. The interesting thing is that the same thing happens in Muslim majority countries like Tunisia, Morocco and even Egypt. When it comes down to the need to present a “progressive” face they want the hijabis working in the kitchens of the elite hotels rather than in the front. It’s really sad.

It is the glass ceiling that is hard to break and just like issues of skin colour prejudice or straight hair vs. kinky hair -being different is still a major issue. And women always get it worse on these things.

I think there has to be a distinction between the legislation of discrimination against Muslim women who wear hijab and personal attitudes about hijab.

I guess I am also concerned with incidences like this where a sister was fired by a corporate leader of Abercrombie.
[...]

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Jamilia

Salaam everyone, I’m a muslim sister who recently converted to Islam one of the struggles I have is finding a store that sells Muslim skirts, are they any stores in US that sell Muslim skirts? Thanks Salaam

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Shahadah Time

You should travel to Somali Mall in Minnesota—it is maxi skirt heaveb!

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Shereece

Assalamu Aleikum, I’m a college student living in American and I’ve been a Muslim for about 7 years now and I started wearing hijab almost a month ago alhamdulillah. My non-Muslim family is very supportive they’re actually quite proud of me for having the courage to wear hijab. I’ve also gotten alotta support from my co-workers and even my bosses which surprised me because I work at a store with a very strict dress code. I’m African-American (not that it matters) and the masjid that I go to is prodominately African-American people almost all of which used to be a part of the Nation of Islam. Anway in my community its very rare to see African-American women wearing proper hijab if they even wear hijab at all. So when I told a few older sisters who don’t wear hijab I was discouraged from doing so which really shocked and hurt me. She told me that I shouldnt wear it to work for security reasons or something of that nature. I just dont understand why Muslims wouldnt support a sister who wants to protect her haya (modesty)

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Paulette

I’m a new convert to Islam and right away because of the connection I wanted to have with Allah and no one else I knew right away that I would be covering my hair! Recently I have run into other muslim women in the store and they just look at me as if they don’t know what to say! Just thee other day here in the bay area at abercombie the clothing store a muslim young lady was fired because she refused to remove her hijab. Of course it made me think bieng a new convert as to the prejudice I will encounter but as an older woman I know that this is about our relationship between ourselves and allah and no one else!
Yes I was ridiculed when I decided to become a muslim by my family and friends and my neighbors stare at me and some are afraid to talk to me but that is because of their ignorance about Islam. I should say that I’m an African American woman who is older and has been through some of the most horrible prejudical experiences by people of all races in this world! So becoming a muslim and wearing the hijab is just another jihad (struggle) to go through for me but when I think about being closer to Allah that is all that matters! We have to be the ambassadors for Islam and wear are hijabs proudly because this is who we are! For many years I was ignorant and afraid of Islam because I didn’t know and I have been in many churches and of many religions and none is more acceptable of all religions and closer to the truth than Islam! Throw back your shouldars, hold your head up , be proud and wear your hijabs my sisters!

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MiniMe

I’m so proud of you Paulette. May Allah shower you with blessings and empower you to endure any internal or external struggles. :D

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Deandre

Articles like these put the consumer in the driver seat-very imnatropt.

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Aisha

Thank you for your encouragement :))

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Judith Epstein

Speaking as an observant Jew, I can tell you that I feel a good bit of kinship with other women who cover their heads/hair — whether with a sheitel (wig), cap, snood, hijab, scarf, veil, or just a hoodie sweatshirt — than with people who don’t. Any time I see a woman who is covered, I feel pretty confident that here is a woman who understands her place in the universe. To paraphrase what Muhammed Ali said to his daughter Hannah: precious jewels are buried deep in the earth, pearls are locked tightly away in oysters, and stars are set far away from us in the sky — and they are much less precious than we are, as human beings. If they are mere objects, and they are covered and hard to attain, then how much more should we, as holy, God-loving women, also be covered! So when I see a covered woman, I know that she respects herself and understands that as God treasures her, she should also treasure herself, because “that which is holy is hidden.”

I also know that the only reason I myself do not wear my scarves tied in the same fashion as Muslimas is because in my neighborhood it would be seen wrong. People would think I was insulting Judaism because I was dressing in a way that wasn’t within the parameters of what Jewish women here wear; and they would think I was insulting Islam by “trying it on” as some kind of costume. In reality, I feel it would make more sense to cover the ears and neck in winter to stay warmer, in summer to avoid sunburn, and to anchor the scarf under the chin so that it didn’t slip off as easily. But… *sigh* it wouldn’t be seen right, so at this time, I don’t do it.

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renita burwell

Guess what Judith? Us non-covered women also have respect for ourselves. We also resent people like you acting like only hijabis and orthodox Jewish women have respect for themselves. We also know our place in the universe-as women who should be respected whether we cover or not.

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NeverEver

As-salamu alaikum,

My experience has been much different I think than a lot of women who have written so far. I think it depends on where you live and what your family situation is.

As for my situation:
1. I converted to Islam last summer, alhamdulillah: As such my family are non-muslims. They do not like the hijab. They constantly ridicule me for wearing it. My brother tells me that by wearing it I am “living in a box” and “judging everyone around me.”
2. I live in a mid sized city in the south US: There are a lot of conservative Christians here. They equate hijab with “foreign” and “dangerous.” The men avoid me (alhamdulillah!) but the women will give me dirty looks. One woman even followed me around the produce section chanting “libery… freedom… liberty… freedom” under her breath.
3. I live in a community where the vast majority of Muslim women wear hijab: There is only a small population who do not wear it, but they are not excluded or picked on alhamdulillah. Also they would never pressure someone to not wear it.

Because of these things, I have had a LOT more trouble with non-Muslims than with Muslims on the issue of hijab. I can see how someone in different circumstances would have different experiences though. If you were born Muslim but your family does not practice hijab and you want to, I can see how that would cause pressure, the same way it causes pressure with my family. The only difference is that my family is non-muslim, so they go in the other category. I don’t think that there are more muslims who oppose hijab than non-muslims, but I can see how it may seem that way depending on your situation.

So maybe instead of this being about whether the people putting pressure on you are “muslim” or “non-muslim” I think it has more to do with “people who accept the hijab” and “people who don’t” whether they are muslim or not.

I also think that Samira brings up a good point about “internalizing fears.” It is motivation for hijabis to police other hijabis but also it is motivation for women to leave hijab altogether. There is so much pressure from outside that it is difficult to keep it, so they give up and come with a list of reasons why.
Allahu alem.

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Christine

Salaam, sisters! For all of the sisters with concerns about prejudices, when we wear our hijab and are active community members, we begin to make hijab a part of the “normal” life of the area in which we live. I absolutely LOVE my hijab and I wear it proudly, knowing that along with all of the other hijabis living their lives and loving their hijab, I am making it a step easier for my daughters to choose to wear the hijab. As to the sisters who have critical comments to make, alhamdullilah I am so busy trying to make myself a better person that I have no time to criticize others or to take to heart their negative views of the hijab.

For Judith – I loved your post. My mom (non-muslim) asked me once how I could tell the difference between the observant Jewish and Muslim women in the neighborhood. I just had to laugh and explain that it was merely a difference in styles common to each group.

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Carib Muslimah

Co-signing Samira 100%. Especially the part about careers and workplaces that are hostile to outward expressions of religion.

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Zaynah

Oh dear, if I’d known my comment would spark such a flurry of reactions… Lol yes, I’m the Z in the sig line there!

I live in Mauritius (which, lol, most people don’t know about. It’s a small tropical island in the Southern Indian Ocean, very much like Hawaii). I’m a born Muslim, and my ancestors are from India. I only started wearing the hijab a year ago, when we enrolled my son in a private Islamic school and noticing everyone wearing hijab and jilbab and long dresses there, it just suddenly struck me that “I could do this too”. Didn’t think too much, and just took the plunge. Overnight, I went from a Britney Spears-lookalike to a hijabi. Lol, that should give you a pretty good idea of how drastic the change was.

My parents were ecstatic, my mom actually, she’s a hijabi. My dad had this really proud expression on his face. In-laws were okay too, since my MIL wears the hijab too. But I hadn’t counted on the reaction of other relatives, even my own SIL, who really ‘looked down’ upon me. It was like, “we’re modern women, so why should we bow to such strict dressing laws? You’ve got all your time for this, you’ll cover up when you’re older.” It’s like Deniz said – when in Rome, do as the Romans, and thus when you’re not in an official Muslim country that has laws ‘forcing’ you to cover up, well then become like the people around you. Someone even told me, ‘why the long jilbab, you could’ve just pulled a scarf on your head with your cropped top and jeans and you’d have worn the hijab’. Well, seemed to me the ‘hijab’ wasn’t just a head covering, it also means dressing modestly and without you looking naked while still wearing clothes.

I knew in a way people would look at me differently. I mean, even I looked at hijabi and ‘covered’ women differently, like, wish I could do that too, someday, but not now coz I’m not ready. I never thought there’d be such a backlash by my own people, like I was doing something wrong, piking out of the ‘modern’ life.

My best friend is a Hindu girl, and when she first saw me covered, she just shrugged and said, ‘if this works for you and you’re okay with it, fine.’ No further fuss. My boss, for whom I work across the Internet, she’s in the US and an Irish Catholic originally from Ireland, never had an issue with it either. When I met her (my name doesn’t give away that I’m Muslim), upon our interview I told her, I’m a Muslim. Her reply was, ‘and your point would be?’ When I told her I was now wearing a hijab, again she was like, ‘so what?’

The girls I grew up with – cousins, sisters-in-law, Muslim acquaintances – I hardly am in touch with them any longer. It’s sad, but I don’t want to be in touch with people who make me feel belittled and as if I should be ashamed of myself when all I’m doing is getting better acquainted and in tune with my faith.

Sorry I wrote up a whole novel! Loved all your comments, ladies!!

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Amy

Wa Salaam Alaikum Hijabi Sisters,

I’m a practicing revert for the past five years, living in VA, USA…Mashallah there are lot of Muslimahs here who cover and I feel so proud to see so many hijabies up in here representing.
Zaynah_I would agree and disagree…because, My own mother non muslim can’t see me in hijab, I also lived in CO,USA …I was like the only hijabie for miles and I had stares from none muslims, (more so their than here in VA.) I also worked at a spa that was Conservative and never had a problem. Some would be shocked to see me at first but once people new me they found me just like a normal person. I have really seen both sides muslims not wearing hijab, non-muslims alike.

For the most part their is a lack of knowledge for the people who are non believers they really don’t know anything about Islam Like my mom they have this fear of it. I do have non muslim friends that respect me for who I am too. I don’t think everyone is like my mom but I do think their is this fear of this so called oppression of being modiest. The same goes for muslims and education their are so many muslims who are unaware of Islam it self and why they should cover or more so are muslims for the sake of a name.

I have struggled myself wearing hijab I have had it on and off. NOW I KNOW I WILL ALWAYS INSHALLAH KEEP MY HIJAB. Wearing it helps me always keep my IMAN. ITS like a constant reminder of Allah swt. Honestly I don’t really give a hoot what others think about it, But it takes time to gain knowledge of ISLAM and i think we should be supportive of our sisters who may not have the IMAN yet to take that step to wear hijab. Because of the fact that we are all at different levels of piety,
I think some may not have that support so they double take that decision to cover or not.
I have had someone not say salaam to me because was wearing it then stoped for a while. (that was when I first started putting hihab). The other day I had this lady come up to me she admired my hijab, i started to talk to here she told me she wanted to cover and she was for awhile but than her husband told her he would divorce here if she continued covering, so now she no longer covers, may Allah bless what is in her heart inshallah.

I am Love my hijab and am currently working at A Spa/cosmetic store @ the mall
I am very confident when I work and wear it. All you working hijabies should be too.
Hear in American you have the freedom of religion, I love that and am so proud of that because I have the right to freely chose to cover my head and know body can tell me other wise.

I would like to give a shout out to -Judith Epstein- your post was awesome thanks for sharing.
To all the other sister your I also enjoyed your posts too, May Allah swt bless us and guide us to the straight path inshAllah.

I work at a cosmetic/spa in the mall…covered.

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mermz

I love that Judith added that Muhammed Ali quote! I have been wearing Hijab since I was 15 or 16, when I finished I high school and started college in Pakistan, it was extremely disturbing to find how anti-hijab muslim men and women are there! I mean, it’s a muslim country so the last thing I expected to feel was uncomfortable in my hijab. I agree with mira, it was just my extended family who criticized me and made fun of the way I looked in my hijab. They said I had taken on an unnecessary burden on myself and that I should be enjoying my youth and not smothering myself with a scarf wrapped around my head 24-7. It used to annoy me so much and make me feel totally dejected and insecure. My friends were surprisingly ok with it, none of them wear hijab and yet none of them have ever teased me about it or commented negatively about my choosing to wear it. I have met many narrow minded people that, because I wear hijab, automatically assume that (a) I can’t speak english and thus talk to each other about me in english until i have to rudely interrupt them and shock and embarrass them down to their cores, (b) assume that i’m poor and uneducated which is the reason why I must cover myself (in shame??? never got that one..), (c) that I think I’m a million times ‘holier’ than them. Either these people are totally insecure or they’re in denial of the Truth. Samira, I agree with you, being outside the community, especially if you want a career in fashion, people try to bring you down by commenting sarcastically or negatively about your hijab. It makes me feel bad, not because I cover, but because we’re muslims and we are trying to suppress a part of our religion that is the least bit of a burden or hinderence. People think that being modern just means dressing in the latest fashions and being open about letting your kids study whatever they like, a HUGE part of being modern means to have an open mind about everything. Well if you’re open minded about nudity, I’m sure you can be open minded about modesty!

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Muslimah

wa salaamu alikium hijabis and niqabis,

i am from the ATL where hijab and niqab is worn stylishly and proudly. i will never get tired of wearing it . i have notice some muslim women have chose not to wear it completely because of fear of retliation or fear of being percieved as a oppressed and ignorant woman. some have even gone as far as saying that hijab is not required. But the truth is that muslimahs should rock hijab for allah (SWT) and not be made ashamed by fellow muslimahs into not wearing it.

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Nishi

I only started wearing true hijab when I turned 22 and its been a year. I have always worn modest clothing though and a scarf but usually loosely tied. Then I made the personal decision to better myself as a muslim and wear hijab and i feel that when it comes from the heart it is so much better, i am lucky to live in South Africa where hijab is not a problem and quite common. Also to have friends who also wear hijab is great, we swap ideas and help each other out with outfits. I always recieve praise for the change I have made and the way other people treat me now is so much different, with more respect especially men!

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Leanne

I think this is all very interesting because personallly I have never had a muslim man or woman say anything to me about wearing hijab and the thought that they might I find very sad and disheartening. I converted almost 2 years and started wearing hijab immediately, but as with most I did have my own struggle. My parents very religious Southern-Baptist (I do live in the Deep South and love it here but have to say I think most people are not educated on other cultures here.) and once they got over my conversion their main problem was with the hijab. And still to this day when I go to visit I have to make my hijab look less muslim so that I don’t draw any unwanted attention in our small town. However, I fully understand and expected my parents reaction. And the support from my own Muslimah friends who wear hijab was very valued and needed for me to continue on my journey. I personally believe everyone is entitled to their own opinion and obvoiusly I believe hijab is necessary but I understand and respect those woman who don’t. Basically hijabi or non-hijab we should all help each other through this journey that is life and become closer to Allah on the way and try to follow our beliefs to the utmost. P.S. I love this comment Mernz (Well if you’re open minded about nudity, I’m sure you can be open minded about modesty!)!

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Anonymous

Grrr, I can’t see the comments!

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mira

One thing that does bother me and I know we shouldnt judge and all that but I really cant handle when see some girls who wear hijab but are not wearing modest clothing. One day I was walking to class and i saw a girl with hijab on but a tank top…her arms were bare all the way to her shoulders…i literally stopped open mouth, dumbfounded. I had never seen that before. You either wear it or you dont. I felt mortified.
I am sorry if I am being judgmental, but I feel like if you are gonna wear it to do so as properly as possible because other people DO look at you and if your not wearing it properly your giving them the wrong image of what hijab really is.

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Xenith K.

LOL! OMG, I laughed so hard when I read this. Similar situation, only this time it was a girl in shorts. I thought it was so sweet, she told me she was starting to wear hijab. I smiled and told her she was half was there:)

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Deniz

well said sister, everytime im about to walk out of the house i take a look at what im wearing to make sure im giving the ‘right’ Muslim image. Not like ‘oooh i gotta look pretty’ or whatever, but more like ‘if im dressed sloppy then people will think of Muslims this way’. Some people already have a negative view on Muslims and especially on hijabis and i dont want to look like im ‘living in a box’ like NeverEver said – i want to look confident and liberated and i want non-Muslims to view us this way and perhaps they too will be drawn to Islam because of the way i present myself. I truly think we should all think about the way we present ourselves in this manner. Not just clothing-wise but in what we do too. Before i covered i felt fine walking down my street without greeting the neighbour or a passer by, i thought nothing of it. But now that i am covered i feel it is important to smile or say hi because i want to come across as happy or content. This is easier to understand for converts or those of you who werent covered before but now are….. if a non-Muslim sees a hijabi looking down at the ground and not giving salams they think negatively of them, moreso if they already had that impression, but if we smile and say hello then we appear more approachable (im talking about salams to women of course) and hence could perhaps bring those to our faith. Theres my two cents (again).

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Aisha

Hi Deniz! I totally agree with you!… I think that being hijabis, we will always have this responsibility to stand up for Islam, no matter what we do, where we are, and who we’re with. Even if it’s something trivial like just walking down the street and saying hello to strangers, I think that DOES make a difference :) Thank you for your 2 cents :D

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Zaynah

Deniz,
I loved your last comment. Most of us put the hijab on by choice and we’re happy and content about it.Thisis what should come across. I personally feel more confident in my jilbab hijab thanI did when I was in jeans and a tee, but that may just be me.
And yes too, if you’re gonna do it, do it right- project the right message.
I also wanted to add, this post (and my comment that sparked it) and all the other comments here, I’m sure sister Kima will agree, was not a way of saying hijab is best or those Muslimahs not wearing it are bad/wrong. No way. It just sparked off as an observation (sad one too) that sometimes those whom you expect to support you don’t. To me it seemed like an echo of the saying “you know who is true to you when you’re in trouble”, you know what I mean?

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mira

This was a great topic sister Kima, loved reading the responses to this.

Personally, “We love hijab” was part of the reason for my choice in hijab. I know it may seem odd, but knowing there is a group of woman i can turn to for support was very positive for me.

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lisandra

I became muslim about 4 years ago and started covering about 2 years ago. In the beggining I was a little uncomftable with the idea but once I did it, I loved it. People may look but its always that curiousity look, I’am hispanic so people are always impress when they hear me speaking my native language and are surprised the fact that I’m muslim. I live in Mass. in a small city and u rarely see any muslim sisters around. I’m the only muslim in my family and they have learned to accept it, I do get allot of compliments from non-muslim ladies and always ask why we do it. But its a honor to look different than eveybody else and to know that by looking at me they know I’m muslim.

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salma

Masha Allah, I read all the comments and I’m very grateful -alhamdulillah- that I’m living in Indonesia. Although Indonesia is the largest muslim population, but I’m currently living in Bali where Hindu population is being the majority. However, non muslims here ( Hindu, Christian, Buddhist, etc) are very tolerant and show great respect for us the hijabis. Similar attitude are shown by muslims who don’t wearing hijab ( yet). We’re not mocking or intimidating each other because of our choices. Of course, I’m still praying to Allah that my non-hijabi muslimahs will receive hidayah and start to dress modesty one day.

I know it’s tougher for being a hijabi in other part of the world, and for that I salute you!

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Farisha

I find this topic is something I can completely relate to. Born in Canada to a Muslim family, I knew I was Muslim but that’s about it. I only came to a realization 3 years ago that our own people are more critical about hijab. I started wearing hijab and practicing Islam 3 years ago and Alhamdolilah my reasons in life are so much more clear than they ever were. Now I am a educated and confident hijabi who contributes to society. I knew that I could expect ignorance and curiosity from non-Muslims but from Muslims??? I come from a family in which there are no other women who wear hijab, so this came as a shock to everyone. I had my own challenges there, because now I became the “extreme” Muslim and not the “moderate or liberal” Muslim. Since when did hijab = extreme??? So not only did I not have support at home, but along with that I lost many of my friends, including my best friend who also was a Muslim. I encounter on a daily basis racist comments, evil glares, but I just do my best and smile because I’m a happy person. One thing that really bothers me is that I can’t really go to many family events or functions in the community like weddings and etc. Why??? I really am tired of people asking me “oh why do you wear hijab?” or “you know you don’t have to wear it, you live in the west” or “you know there’s nothing in the Quran about hijab, its just a Arab cultural thing” I just am not sure if we all are reading the same Quran? I never think I’m better than anyone else because of hijab, it was just my choice to do so and everyone has the choice to wear it or not. I think many Muslims living here are trying to hard to assimilate into society the wrong way. In fact, when a non-muslim asks me about hijab, I feel good about sharing it with them, because mostly those who ask are sincere in their questioning, and trying to understand. When Muslims ask, most the time they try to challenge my responses and act like I’m the poster child for some “extremist group”. Are we not all apart of the same ummah?

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Rachida

Amy~Salaam Alaikum~
I also live in VA-Richmond and I’m trying to transition to wearing hijab..Inshallah I will I just want to make sure I’m ready. The work thing makes me a little nervous because I deal with Brokers and people who seem to not understand Islam..
But reading your post assures me that we can do it inshallah and through us people can better understand Islam! May allah (SWT) bless you.

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Planing to Convert

I became interested in the middle east when I was a junior in high school and by senior I was gradually researching Islam online. I am a freshman in college now and am so glad for the presence of muslim girls on my campus whom I have befriend. When I began researching, I always had this little thought about converting. Last semester, I became for serious and decided to minor is Islamic World Studies and I will be taking my first course, Intro to the Quaran in fall 2010. Three weeks ago, I checked out books, on being Muslim in America, Women Embracing Islam, and the first of many volumes of a translation of the Quaran. Last Friday was a really important day for me when I watched two girls take shahada at my univeristy MSA’s Islam Awareness week dinner. I was overcome with happiness for them and after much thinking over the weekend that I would also liek to take shahada in the future. Actually, I had been taking steps in my daily life to kind of prepare myself to live as a muslim. I would love to take shahada now, but I feel its important to learn more about Islam and get used to living as a muslim. I have stopped eating meat as a whole in order to refrain from eating pork (started 3weeks ago), I have been trying to cover all but my wrists or ankles. And I have been looking for hijabs online. Next week I will be attending a discussion group for the muslim females at my school near the small studen run mosque at my university. I am excited to learn more about Islam from the Quaran and other practicing muslims because most of what I know now is from the internet and books. I know these posts are more about hijabs, but I wanted to share my news anonymously because I am not telling anyone really yet (non-muslim or muslim). I want to be very ready before I share my decision. And since this is about hijabs, once I learn more about islam I will definitely start wearing a hijab before I take my shahada! Any advice from converts about talking to family or friends would be REALLY appreciated. I was raised Christian/Catholic and all of my friends (except for the new muslim onse I have recently made at school are non-muslim….Christian). And how do you adapt to covering up in the summer when its hot? Do you “warn” you boss/coworkers at work before you start wearing the hijab? Advice would be awesome :)

~soon-to-convert

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Planing to Convert

I totally missed Quran! I am sorry. I dont know why I did that.

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Zehra

Salam sister,

I am also a convert to Islam. I have been for 3 years now, and wearing hijab. I was catholic before my conversion. I did not tell anyone at my job about my hijab before I started to wear it, just I did, because they can not do anything to you. If they fire u because of that, they should be ready for a law suit. If it makes u feel better, tell your manager and discuss if u should wear certain colors if you have a dress code, etc. Other than that, there is no reason to tell, because it is not their business. It is your own Jihad, :). Next thing, in the summer time I would suggest to wear rayon material scarfs, or if u like cotton just wear an under cap instead what I call “baby hijab”. To talk with ur parents? That is tough because no one likes change especially if they were brought up a certain way, strict especially. So just reassure them u still believe in Jesus, just a different story. Educate hem about the religion a little because I think that is what scares them the most because they “don’t know” just they know what they hear on the TV. Oh, and don’t just stop eating meat, find a place that serves Halal Meat. You can eat this meat, its is how the animal is cut basically which makes it ok, still no pork. I wish u all the best of luck, and I am so happy t hear that you are planning to convert, mashallah. Take care,and good luck your future.

Huda Hafiz,
Zehra

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Planning to convert

Thank you Zehra for your advice. I did not stop eating meat for ever. I just cut out all meat for a few weeks because I thought it would be easier for me to stop eating pork, then I would start eating other meats again. Did you read any good books/guides before/during your conversion to help your understanding of Islam and lifestyle?
And what does “Huda Hafiz” mean?

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Taqwa

Hey Planning to Convert!!
Wow, your story just gave me the goosebumps :D, I find it so amazing when people enlighten themselves about Islam, and do it with such purity that they are perceptive of the truth presented in it. I’m pretty sure you already know a lot about Islam if you have reached the point where you want to convert. But there is something I want to tell you about Islam, Muslims tend to strive for perfection in the sense that they start to deprive themselves of many things they love, for instance music, etc. And girls who start to wear the hijab will do the full hijab which is the jilbab or abaya, which is much different than simply dressing modeslty. What i suggest is that you take it easy at first, that you focus not on the extremes, but rather on the salat and remembrance and simply getting closer to Allah and having generosity as a part of your main attribute, and of course treating people with respect on all levels, so basically purifying your soul. Then, as your faith inshallah becomes stronger, then you can focus choose whether or not you want to listen to music or wear a jilbab, wtv. Also, eat meat its fine, just pork stay away from, there are many different opinions by sheikhs in regards to the meat issue, some say that you can only eat the halal meat and halal meaning a certain way for slaughtering and others say that in Western countries its ok to eat out even if the meat isnt purely halal just as long you’re not eating pork.

But yeah, i know that whatever happens you will be just fine, im sure the MSA and the Muslim brothers and sisters are going to be there for you as a sister and they will encourage you, and of course Allah is always with you. No matter what, whatever people tell you, the truth is in you, dont overthink, dont take to whatever negative comments you hear about Islam from nonMuslims and people who have this closed off perspective about Islam, know that Allah has guided you and has shown you the way. At the end of the day, Islam is simple, believing there is no god but allah, Muhammad is his prophet and being there for people around you, simply being a good citizen OR you can look at it this way, Submission to Allah and Service to Mankind.

Good luck and if you ever need anything all Muslims are here for you :D

Taqwa

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salma

Planning to convert, I’m coming from tropical country when the temperature is warm for the whole year. I suggest that you add your cotton long skirts collection. Peasant skirts are great. They are very comfortable to wear during hot season and very hijab friendly. I also found that woven material like cotton, linen, or rayon are much more comfortable and cooler rather than stretch/knit material like jersey. Actually after you’re being a hijabi, you’ll surprise to find out that hijab is not as uncomfortable as other people may think…even during hot season.

So, welcome sister…May Allah always bless you and all muslim sister in the world. Salaam

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khadija

Salams everyone,

I am a born muslim, but I do not wear hijab. Most of the women in my family don’t even though we are from a predominantly muslim country. I was pondering the hijab since my last year of high school (I went to a Catholic high school). I am a sophomore in college now. I have already made up my mind to wear the hijab, but I want to get better with my prayers first. I tend to miss a few or stack them up later. I though it would be hypocritical to wear hijab, while not performing my salah consistently. I am getting much better inshallah and next year I will be taking a class in Arabic and islamic studies to learn more about my deen. My parents feel it is up to me to decide. My dad is all for it, but he says I should do it when I’m ready and not to please anyone else, but Allah and myself. My mom although she is very religious, ironically she doesn’t feel it is necessary. She is someone who never misses a salah and she is kind-hearted. My dad is actually the one who is a little more relaxed in his beliefs, but he takes islam seriously as well. I guess for some reason she does not yet understand the purpose of hijab. I always wear modest clothes, but I want to become closer to my deen and wear the full hijab. I always admired girls who did it. I was afraid of being judged since I live in the U.S. But now I don’t care what people think. It is actually a motivation for me to wear proudly with confidence it and show people that it is not is not oppression, but liberation. They are plenty of hijabis who are edcuated and independent. I feel a perfect time to begin is Ramadan, since it is in about five months and it is a very holy time. In the meantime, I will focus on learning more about my deen and perfecting my salah and other habits.

I would love to read more comments about sisters who decided to wear the hijab and what challenges they faced wearing it. How has your life changed after you began to wear the hijab?

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tehreem

I live in Canada and just started wearing hijaab around 3 weeks ago. I should probably mention I’m 14 years old…Well anyways, I didn’t get any extreme or troubling remarks about it. I remember I took a sick leave of 2 days and just randomly started in the middle of the year…so, I got a few load “whoah!”s and some guy gave me a disappointing look and said “what happened to you?” Luckily, that was the only negative comments I got (not counting the girl who grabbed my shoulders and asked me what was wrong in a concerned voice). I got a lot of nice comments though. Lots of people commented that I looked somehow prettier(don’t know if that’s bad…). So no hardships here :)

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Planning to convert

And thank you for all the comments from all ladies ( Taqwa, Salma, and Khadija )regarding my first post!

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Tina

Muslims vs. Non-muslims? I don’t think we can compare the two. Why? Because non muslims might not like the idea of hijab at all but the majority of them will not voice their opinion. ;) So we don’t really know what they think.

As for the muslims, just because someone does not wear hijab and gives you a list of reasons for not wearing it doesn’t mean they don’t believe the hijab is a MUST. They are probably struggling with their deen and inshallah they will be guided to wear it one day. But of course there are also a lot of those who believe hijab to be just symbolic and that it is optional in Islam. To me, these people don’t know Islam very well. There is a third group and these women wear it because of culture–not religion. They see their moms, aunts, women in the neighborhood wear it and they do the same. However, if they had an option they’d probably take it off because they don’t know the true meaning of hijab.

I started wearing hijab this past Ramadan and alhamdulilah I’ve had a great experience so far from both muslims and non-muslims. I think the #1 trick is to ACCEPT yourself– be comfortable with who you are and others will see through you. Also, be personable! A smile or a nice word can take you a long way. :) Another tip, don’t take it personally if someone says something rude outloud because people are ignorant. Make d’ua for them so that Allah guides them.

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Emyn Dweik

As a non-muslim woman, and a Native American I have been wearing a hijab for over 4 years and I have no problem with it. I feel naked without it. I get more comments from Muslim women who for some reason tell me to take it off. At the same time they are not wearing one. They ask why I’m wearing a skirt when they have tight pants on and their shirts are very tight that you can see their chest. I respect my husband this is why I wear it. I also want to teach my daughters’ that you must cover for modesty and Allah. I am proud that I wear it.

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Kendriana

I’m not Muslim, but by looking at the pictures you posted with what you wrote I’m pretty sure that’s not what hijab looks like right?
I’m thinking of converting but when I see stuff like this it sends me mixed messages about Islamic tenants….

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Kendriana

I feel like maybe none of you find it urgent to wear it because it’s not all that important to you, or you can’t get past insecurities associated with hijab for God.
Is that what’s going on cause…I already feel uncomfortable about the fact that if I convert I would be faced with possibly having to wear one.

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Kendriana

Man…I’m confused about all this.

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Ikram

Salam to all,
Well first up Kendriana, watever you chose to do may it be the best for you. Unfortunately we live in a society where different, unique = BAD! As Muslimahs we have the obligation to cover ourselves for the sole sake of Allah ( S.W.T). Other muslims should influence your decision. I know its weird from non-muslims perspective, looking at girls who cover every inch of their bodies but know that not only does the Quran command covering one’s awrah(private parts) but all the major religions prescribe the same. There are lots of muslims who judge other muslims when they wear the hijab but know they might think that what they are doing is wrong but as muslims we must have patience because InshALLAH justice will be served. Hope this helps !!

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Thinking

Hello Kendriana.
I am will hopefully be taking my shadadah in May, so I am a convert. Today was my first day wearing hijab and I am a freshman in college. Before I decided officially to convert, I had already decided that I would wear hijab. The purpose of dressing hijab is to be modest my covering yourself so others (especially males) do not focus on your body…..but instead on the kind of person you are. But dont be mistaken, being a hijabi doesnt meaning looking “boring or drab” if you dont want to. I dont have money to go shopping for new clothes, so I am basicaky wearing long sleev shirts and carnigans under/atop clothes that I already own.

With the hijab, it is not an easy thing. Before today, my friend (who is already converted) and I wore hijab together all day over the weekend. Sure, you might have some people look at you, maybe some questions. But, So far today, I have not had any negative experiences. I guess its a easier for me to do hijab because there are other muslim girls on campus whom I have friended and because they wear hijab, its more comfortable for me to do it too. The inky way you will be at ease wearing hijab is if you read/learn/ask/understand the purpose for wearing hijab and why its important. Once you do, InshAllah, everything else will work out.

Hope this helps :)

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Rachida

Salaam Alaikum Kendriana,

I coverted a year ago and I’m getting ready to cover permanetly inshallah. I think it is always on our mind and there is some guilt that we carry if we do not wear the hijab (at least that is what I have felt from day one) but you have to be ready to wear it and in my opinion you would be going backwards if you put it on (not knowing why you did it) and then taking it off and Islam is about progression of ones self. So you have to build your Iman and learn as much as you can. Don’t get me wrong I think a lot of women are strong and do it the first day and they are fine with it and it works out alhamdulillah.

Inshallah Allah will show you they way. Best of luck to you and may allah bless you.

Salaam.

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Kendriana

hmmmm………..
very interesting.
Thanks for the input!

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Asma

I am from the U.S born and raisedand currently live in maryland. I have worn hijab since I was about 4 years old I am now 27. The only comments I have really gotten were from non-muslims. I used to live in an area where the muslim community was very small so you get a lot of stares, comments, people assuming you dont speak english because you wear hijab. I had a previous manager at an old retail job I worked at asking me not to “wear chiquita banana colors” to work and she laughed as if it were funny. Now I get many compliments on how I wear it and the different colors styles I wear from muslims and non-muslim. I personally feel more beautiful with hijab than without and couldnt imagine not wearing it regardless of the comments. I dont judge those that do not cover, but I feel as if you do wear hijab you are making more of a statement so you should be mindful of your whole outfit not just your hijab. I have seen girls with hijab and wearing a mini skirt and tight leggings or even worse a santa hat on top of the hijab, or in Dearborn mi have saw a young girl wearing a corset with a hijab. I think for those that are wearing it we should be more mindful that how we represent ourselves is dawa to others.

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Jessie

Hello everyone.

I have a somewhat different prespective, in that I’m a non-muslim who wears Hijab. I’m Canadian, and I’ve never been comfortable with the way women here as expected to dress. I feel like dressing immodestly is, among other things, unprofessional. I want people to judge me for my personality, my intelligence, and my character, not my measurements. So, I have started wearing Hijab.

Because I live in a predominately irish / Scottish area, it’s pretty rare that I see another Hijabi. I get a fair amount of ribbing from my friends and family, but I think it’s mostly meant in good humour. My mother occasionally jokingly askes me “if I’m allowed” to do ordinary things like eat bread, but I think it’s just her way.

So… I guess I haven’t had much negativity from either muslims or non-muslims. One of the nicest parts of wearing Hijab has been how chivalrous local muslim men have been to me. I’m sorry to hear that my experience isn’t the norm!

Oh, by the way, the funniest hijab-related question I ever was asked was by a 12 year old boy at my Cadet corps’ – “Do you wear that scarf because you have, like, spock ears under there or soemthing?”

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Inal

***To Moderator*** Please delete my second comment still under moderation. Thank you

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Wondering...

Hello Sisters!

My question is actually more for the non-Muslim hijabis….
I myself am not Muslim, but for a long time I’ve been really wanting to wear hijab. I believe very much in pleasing God through dressing modestly, and so I try my best now to cover my body. I really love the reason for wearing hijab and unfortunately I just haven’t been able to muster up the courage to start wearing it….

Fear of disrespecting Muslim women who do wear it, and because I know my family will not understand… I already get remarks about the way I dress for being “too conservative”..Emyn Dweik, your post really got to me, as you had mentioned that Muslim women tell you, not to wear hijab?

I’m just curious, what prompted you to start wearing it?
And for the Muslimahs, in all honesty, does it bother you for non-Muslim women to want to wear hijab, for the same reasons of modesty and to please God? Just curious.

Thank you in advance for your advice girls!
God bless you all.

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Aisha

In all honesty, as a hijabi, it does not bother me if i know that a non-Muslim woman wants to wear hijab for the sake of pleasing Allah(Subhanahu wa Ta’ala).

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naila sharif

i did not heared any comments about hijab but i isaw that there r people that say we all true believer and lover of hazrat muhammad (pbuh) only by toungue not by their personality they show them believer of muhammad.but i think when u love or believe with on one u must be do all that things that another wants than u become a true believer.as that enter in islam fully.without hijab i thing we cant save as from the evils.

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Tina

hey Wondering,

Why should it bother muslim women if you wear hijab? You gave the answer beautifully when you said ” I believe very much in pleasing God through dressing modestly, and so I try my best now to cover my body.”
So you are wearing it to please God, just like everyone else should be doing. And as a muslim, I feel you are a very special person and God is guiding and protecting you.

Good luck :)

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Wondering...

=) Praise God.

Thank you so much Tina, for your encouraging words. =)

I pray that God will continue to guide me, as you have said… and I will continue to pray about it, and whatever is His will… may it be done in my life. =)
God bless you sister!

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Mimi

Hello Wondering!

I too am non-Muslim, but I still dress conservatively. When I’m out I wear long sleeves, long shirts, pants, a headscarf, etc. I do it partially because I’m in a Muslim country and I want to be a good representative of Jesus, showing people around me that I care about morals and holiness just as they do. Also, I do it to show people in my part of the world that not all Westerners are like what they see on TV, especially since many Western countries are considered “Christian” countries. I want to show them what a real Christian is. Lastly, I dress this way to protect the men around me. If a man could not focus on God because he was distracted by me, that would be horrible. If I caused a guy to stumble or to get the wrong view of Jesus because I looked immoral in my dress, that would not be a good thing at all.

Dressing conservatively is not a bad thing. I will admit that when I go back to my home country I dress a bit differently (no head scarf, for example), but I still dress quite modestly for the culture I’m in. The Bible does not have exact rules on how to dress the way Islam does, but there is still a principle of modesty that applies to us women. I’m all for representing God well to others and being treated with respect by men! I’m all for helping to keep men’s minds pure and focused on the things of God!

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New Hijabi & Soon to be Convert

I have been hijabi for two weeks now and I am very happy with my decision. But, to be honest its not easy. I am a a freshman living on a college campus and where I live the weather is much warmer now. Before I decided to convert I was the person who liked wearing summer clothes all year long and hardly wore long sleeves. So I started covering all but hands, feet, and face 5-6 weeks ago to get adjusted. Its been interesting as non-Muslim students thinks is weird or they are curious as to why I was wearing long sleeves and pants when it was warm out side, and now especially since all the other girls are in shorter dresses and skirts. I guess its kind of like my own personal jihad because its sometimes a struggle interacting with people who are uncomfortable or lack knowledge about hijab. I have not yet converted (although I have wanted to and figured that the first thing I could do for Allah and myself is to start hijab……..it was interesting with how a few Muslims (non-hijabis) would tell me that I don’t have to because its not necessary and that even if I wanted I should wait. I disagreed because I had agreed with the idea with hijab before I decided to convert and even though its been effort everyday……I am glad I did it and pray the Allah (SWT) gives me the strength to make this a permanent addition to my life) because I wanted to tell my parents first and my family is practicing Catholics so I felt it was respectful to wait until after Easter to tell them. I am still a little apprehensive about telling them but I have been writing out everything I wanted to say and today my muslim friends helped me friend proof in the Quran so I am prepared for questions they might ask. If they do not have a big problem with my conversion, I feel like tension would still arise over my decision to wear hijab.

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Rachida

Dear New Hijabi & Soon to be Convert,

Salaam Alaikum sister,
Mashallah that is amazing what you are doing, May Allah (SWT) reward you and continue to guide you. Best of luck with you and your family. That seems like it is the hardest thing (at least it was for me) they were not very excepting of it at first but after time and questions they are happy.

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Iqraa Shahid

yes i really agree with the statement! i dont wear the hijab yet but in a couple on months i will be and i know for a fact that my cousins will be the ones who dont like it but my non-beliveingfriends wont have a problem at all! infact a few of my friends i have told who are not muslims btw anyway they all think its “cool” which is a typical thing for white people to say…but my girl cousins who i am very close to all of them will have a problem and will say things like”take it off” and stuff! :O

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J

Thank you all for your really wonderful comments. I am a white former Catholic of eastern European descent, living in a notoriously agnostic/atheist city, and attending a liberal neighborhood Methodist church, who is thinking of converting. So, I’ve been spending a lot of time thinking about what hijab means… I find my own self-confidence to be the biggest hurdle. I’m afraid of sticking out like a sore thumb. I’m afraid of not looking “pretty.” I’m afraid I won’t be able to stick with it, and that others will remember my failed hijab attempt. Funny, though, that these feelings PROVE that Western women get more wrapped up with what they look like on the outside than on the inside. I’m sure hijab would improve my confidence in ways that my current wardrobe never will. Yet here I am, on the fence!

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Bayan

I don’t have a single problem with hijab, but I KNOW my mom will have a problem if I want to cover my feet, or wear jilbab, or only wear closed-toe shoes. Which is why jilbab has become a big heart-wrenching thing for me right now…

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siti hajar

Assalamualaikum

hi i’m from Malaysia and yes… i have too agree wif the article. . i was even called stupid and ‘taliban’ by my own family member when i started wearing hijab. There is even an NGO in Malaysia that is againts the wearing of hijab and these people are muslims.

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Sanna

aslamu alaikum,
i live in Egypt and i have been wearing the hijab since i was 8.i lived in the U.S. for most of my life but now i’m living in Egypt. many people ask me were you forced to wear hijab or did you want to wear it? and i always answered with the same answer i have always wanted to wear it. most people tell me that i shouldn’t wear it b/c it doesn’t allow me to put make-up while i am somewhere and it covers my beauty.

i think this is all nonsense. Allah(swt) doesn’t do anything if it weren’t for the person’s own safety/good. hijab makes a woman safer and it also shows they are respectful and are religious. most of my friends ask me about marriage and how i could get married if i wear hijab. i tell them a woman who wears the hijab has a better reputation than 1 who doesn’t since others try to show off and be impolite to get a man’s attention.

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Kate

I’m from the U.S., and I do not currently identify with one religion, but I have a lot of respect for those who do. In fact, I find it inspiring to come in contact with people who HAVE religious views. (My community’s religious orientation is predominantly Christian or Catholic, with Mormonism, Jehova’s Witness, Greek Orthodox or Judaism as the minority religions. However, this does not mean that I view my society as a religious society, because there are a lot of people who label themselves as religious, but hardly practice.) With that said, due to this lack of “examples” of what it means to be a religious person, I find it very inspiring to know that there are people in the world who practice religion (and at the center of their society!!) I know in my heart that I believe something, and am still on the path to figuring that out. I am ashamed to admit this, but only in the past couple of months have I read anything about Islam. (Perhaps I was ignorant to my surroundings. It is sometimes hard to be curious about a religion if you never have contact with people of that faith. For example, I know very little about scientology or shinto.) Even more so, my curiosity for Islam was sparked due to the current political grounds of France (and the attempt to ban the burqa). Because of this political hot-button, I wanted to know the view of Muslim women, not just the Western-view, and found myself agreeing whole heartedly with them. (you!) Sarkozy (and much of the west) says that the veil suppresses women, whereas EVERYWHERE I have read, women say that they wear the hijab, (and the niqab, and the burqa) by choice (aside from a few societies where the burqa is enforced, but not law). I love that.

So no, I, a non-Muslim, do not have a “problem” with the hijab. I find it beautiful and encouraging that the hijab can be a visual symbol that someone is religious and actively practices religion day to day . That’s what religion means to me, having it encompass your life. Not just an activity that you go to on a certain day of the week.

So, maybe this is a different view, but I wasn’t raised in a religious household (albeit a very loving and supportive household), so I think that those who have the opportunity to encounter religious people daily, is a blessing.

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Leila

Hi Kate

What a refresing comment!! If only everyone had such an open -mind. It nice to hear another point of view :)

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Metoo

Salams, I live in the US, (Midwest). I dont get any real flack from muslim sisters. I wear hijab and most (not all) of the women in my family do too. I used to live in a big city and take the bus, so many non-muslim women would compliment me on my scarves and outfits all the time- that they were beautiful. I think it is mainly non-muslim men that in my experience had issues. One guy at a gas station told men “you dont have to wear that, this is America” Like I was a slave and no one told me that the slaves had been freed,lol. He didnt walk up to me, but I heard him. Just the other day when I was at the grocery store as I turned the corner an older man said to his wife “Man! you cant turn a corner without running into another A-rab! lol Im not Arab, but same difference. Things like this make me laugh. I haven’t had a lot of issues, I have family members that have had some issues.
For the women that were asking about non-muslim women covering, I think if you want to do something to feel closer to God, that is your choice. You shouldn’t think “are other people going to be ok with this”? I used to live near a jewish community and the women were always coverd (in the summer time too) and they wore little headscarfs! Pretty cool.

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jasse

Hi,, Iam muslim grew up and live in Europe,,, I would love to wear the hijab but dont know how to begin,, I mean i want to please my God,,, i do pray and fast but not wearing the hijab,, since i got married my husband is pushing me to wear it but in the same time he doesnt want to force me to wear the hijab,, I just dont have the power to wear it,, everytime i think about it and get close to it then i get weaker because my whole life style will change if i wear the hijab,,, what can i do???

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Ria

Hey, actually I have been wearing hijab since grade 6 now its grade 8 and i need help with my grade 8 graduation, everyone is tellin me to leave my hair out but i say no! like what would be the use for 3 years went for nothing? , I dont know i am planning to wear my hijab but i need to wear and dress, whoch is hard to find > any advice how and what i should wear? so i dont look like a fool :)

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MeToo

@Ria Congrats on graduating. You seem to be a strong girl, definately dont listen to anyone telling you to uncover, its your body. To get a dress I’d suggest going to Old Navy, they usually have some cute dreses this time of year. If you have time before your graduation search for “maxi dresses” online. They are long and flowy – very comfortable. I have a few maxi dresses and love them! Good Luck.

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aminah

Agreed! Muslim girls need to show confidence. Confidence is key. I guarantee you, no one will bother you when your head is up and your walk is similar to that of Gisele Bundchen (runway model). No one wants to pick on you when you have that pure yet fiery glow about you. Stay true to yourself and love what you do, and people will respect that.

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hanan

i disagree i think that muslim dont complain about wearing hijabs unless they went threw situations where they felt like it was neccesarry and it was hurting them due to what others have to say to them.for those who feel like they dont have to wear the hijab because other people make fun of them then your just not tuff enough.to those who want to make a change and start wearing but are hesitated then your right you really are not powerful enough.i live in new york,usa and i have had many people compliment me on wearing the hijab and people telling they respect me because i choose to wear it.to the people who think it is oppression then thats a shame.its not oppression at all its a choice being made by a person who follows their belief and, if it is looked upon wronly to others then one should become more and more stronger and stay being confident about themselves.what i think about non-mulims who judge muslim women is that they just want everyone to be like them .why is that they get mad when a women is covered up its not like they own her. then they ask if were hot, ofcourse we are in the summer time but anyway its not your buisness.muslim women are the most confident women why because they choice to follow their beliefs in islam and are not afraid to be judge.why is that they feel bad for her,they dont even know anything about her or how she feels.why is that they asume that were diffrent when we both are humans.

i love being muslim and im not afraid to be who i was born to .alhamdillallah i wear my hijab.

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Rana

Elsalam Alaikom,

I’m an Egyptian Muslim girl who lives in Canada. I just want to say that I admire every single woman who wears the hijab especially those who live in the Western Society. The courage and power I see in them is beautiful and it just rays out of their eyes which is much more attractive than having your hair done. I don’t have any hijabi friends, and I must say that is probably why I don’t wear one myself. Yes, society plays a huge part in your daily decisions and it embarasses me sometimes to think that I’m scared of people’s reactions and the way they would look at me/judge me. I always pray to god that some day I will no longer have this fear of wearing it. I think that some girls look so much better with the hijab on and the way they dress may not be from runways but its definetely very stylish. I love all the comments here and I just wanted to add that I noticed not only hijab helps you cover, but I feel like hijab is an attitude. It changed your behaviour and adds so much modesty and simplicity to many girls.

Thank You

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Eleni

I love my hijabi sisters! I pray for the strength to finally wear hijab like I should. I always have so many excuses: hijab will keep me from a job, hijab will make people prejudice against me, blah blah blah…For some reason I feel that I have worked so hard to succeed why would I take two steps back and make it harder for myself? I have gone through so much hard stuff already!

I tried wearing hijab to see how I liked it and how people responded to me. I had no negative reactions from non-Muslims. However, I live in New York City and you are only gawked at when you’re in niqab or burqua. I had one little old Italian lady tell me she remembered when scarves were popular with non-Muslim women and how she missed it.

Some of the hijabis in my school are definitely a little stand offish and don’t even offer you a selam when you walk by in hijab. They just take you apart with their eyes as you walk by. A little creepy since we’re all supposed to support each other. Also, on the bus other hijabis will just stare at you like, “Should I say selam or not?” HELLO! YES!

I love to see girls rocking their scarves. I envy them, actually. I feel like a quarter Muslima without it – but this mental block! I don’t want to make excuses…It’s not that I can’t see myself wearing it, only that I cannot wear it without a clear conscious like a faker and resenting it. I want to wear it because I love Allah and love myself.

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J

I did it!!! A month and a half after I first posted here, I decided that YES, Islam was for me, and YES, I was going to wear hijab. I set June 1 as my starting date and actually started on the evening of May 31st. I feel really good about my decision and it definitely gets easier every day.

There is some fine print to this… I don’t go out of the house much, because I work at home, and I’ve been lazy about wearing it in my own yard (partially for fear of what my immediate neighbors will think; the lady of the house has a brother who converted to Islam and a non-practicing Muslim hubby, and there are some hard feelings there, probably). But I still did it!!!

It certainly helps to think of all my sisters out there, being brave and looking dignified and beautiful. Thanks!

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Rachida

J,

Salaam Aleikom sister!
Mashallah I’m so happy for you and finding Islam.

Salaam.

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Aziza

I’m a muslim and I don’t wear hijab but I actually admire muslim women who do. Even women of other faiths cover themselves – look at nuns for examples. However I am careful of how I dress – in that modesty is more important to me than fads or being “in”

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JohnPlayerPlz

I don’t think I have that much of a problem with the hijab, I think I just don’t understand its meaning. If God gave you hair.. why hide it? Men don’t have to cover themselves. It makes no sense to me. But there again, I come from a completely different culture and grew up with different values/believe systems.

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Xenith K.

Hi John,

Hope you’re well. I just wanted to tell you that men also have to cover themselves. Men have to dress in a modest way as well.

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Maisah

-Maisah

Well, I am not surprised about this at all because yes i hear lots of Muslims say ”Oh hijabs make my hair sweat in the summer” , or ”Oh I’m going to get a bad tan on my forehead” Its the little stupid things that comes out of Muslims mouths, But they really don’t know they are actually saying. They are sitting there complaining about what their lord wants them to do so they can make it through this life. The question is if you don’t want to wear it, Then why are you Muslim? that’s my question. Wearing a hijab IS NOT GOING TO HARM YOU OR YOUR BODY! because i have been wearing a hijab for a very long time and i don’t have one scratch or burn on me. Yes it really is Muslim woman and girls who are complaining.

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Naseha

I totally agree, it is muslims girls who complain a lot about the hijab..It’s been a year since i started wearing the hijab and i started around the age of 15 I’m 16 now. My friends and me were one of those people who had problems with the hijab. Truthfully (talking as an insider) there was this superiority issue, where non hijabi’s thought girls with hijabs were more superior which is not the case at all. Also we were afraid because we (especially those who live in western culture) started going by the western philosophy of living life to the fullest and someone has this wild idea that being muslim means you can’t have fun. Thank Allah i have new friends now…but let me tell you something me and my friends we are crazy and wild….not according to western standards though. We are socialites and we love to have fun laugh have a good time. But we also know our restrictions and draw a fine line between good and bad, we also try to remember Allah everytime we are faced in an uncomfterble situations. Let me tell you something. Before, when i didn’t wear the hijab, i thought ” oh i can’t start now, i have gym I’ll die” but now I’m more active then ever and i go to the gym WITH my hijab on. It makes me feel so good that i can do all these daily activities proudly with a hijab on while remembering Allah, it makes people think twice about wearing the hijab. My life has completly transformed after, it became better i was more at peace and i knew my priorties. Yes, there are times when i contemplate but it’s best to remember Allah at those times of contemplation because 9/10 times it is most likely Shaytaan trying to intimidate you. I thank Allah for my transformations and i hope one day you guys can feel at peace like i do. :)
AllaHafiz.

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Jawaher

Hey Muslimahs!!
I’m from the U.S., Texas to be exact…basically where tank tops and short shorts can be worn all year round…
I’m 17 now, but i first wore hijab when my parents got jobs in Medina, Saudia Arabia. Yes, I said Medina. One of the two most holy sites on earth for muslims…and i was totally enlightened.
When we moved back to Texas however a year later, I’ll have to admit i was incredibly reluctant to continue wearing hijab, simply because i was afraid of all the questions and strange looks my school friends would give me…

I was so wrong. Teachers seem to give me that much more respect, and I’ve had random strangers in the bathroom or hallways stop and compliment the scarf i was wearing that day…
I’ve rarely even gotten the “do they make you wear that?” question, but i’ve been asked plenty of times about how many hijabs i own, and can i seriously match one to every outfit?

So basically, yeah. Us muslim women are harder about the hijab, as opposed to nonmuslims who are just like, hey…i like my tank tops, she likes her scarf, everyone’s happy.
:D

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muamera

I agree with Z’s statement. I live in the USA, washington state and there are many muslimas here that are not ashamed to wear hijab; however, my close friend is a muslim and her mother and sister wear hijab but she does not.

She loves to call out many of our sisters to make herself look better because she does not wear hijab but they do therefore it strengthens her beliefe that not wearing a hijab is more of a right thing to do than to wear one.

She claims to pray daily, go to the mosque, fast, eat halal meat and be a “good” person, yet she refuses to wear hijab because she is self concious about what her boyfriend, his family, friends and others she knows will think of her.

Once we were together at the mall and i was looking for some appropriate clothing for the summer, and we had been discussing her wearing hijab for a few weeks when she blurted out that she had decided to wear hijab that same summer.
At that same moment she confessed she wanted to be a hijabi, her boyfriend called. out of curiousity she asked him what he thought of her wearing a hijab, and he told her he was “ok” with it. When she admitted she had decided to wear hijab to him, he blurted out to her and said “then what the hell am i suppose to show off to my friends.” i asked her later that week if she was still going to wear hijab and she said “oh its just not for me, im better off without it because a lot of muslim girls that wear it are sluts anyways.”
what a shocker huh?

Many of my christian friends support me wearing my hijab, it is my “muslim friends” that are actually against it.

esselamu aleykum sisters.

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Yusra

I totally agree . it’s other muslim women and girls who think like that . and especially women who don’t practice Islam correctly , they just don’t like hijab . I’ve met some people who think that wearing hijab is just like killing yourself . in many women’s opinion , when you wear hijab , you don’t have the right to do many things ; like having afashion style , or enjoying your life . other girls who believe in hijab , and who know that muslim women Must wear hijab , always find a pretext like “when I’ll get married ” , “I’ll wear hijab after I find a job” …..
it’s really bad to see that other muslim women think that way about us , we their sisters in Islam ……
non-muslim people respect our religion , and they know that you must look what a hijabi girl have in mind , not on her head …

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naba

the ruddest comment i’ve ever gotten on my hijab was from a non muslim. a non muslim girl also told me a story once about how a hijabi went to the hairdresser to get her hair done and then the hairdresser gave her dirty looks after she left because she was like “i spent so much time doing her hair and now she’s covered it so that no one except her and her husband can see it..” etc. i live in saudi arabia but go to boarding school in canada and i have travelled around the world and discovered that i mostly get dirty looks from non muslim strangers rather than my muslim family members even though my extended muslim family members in pakistan do give me weird looks at times..

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Jo

I’m a white American woman who converted 7 years ago and started wearing hijab before I even said shahadah. Never once has any non-Muslim said or done a single rude thing to me regarding hijab or being Muslim. Anyone who’s looking at me usually is debating over whether or not it would be rude for them to ask me about Islam, since they are genuinely curious/interested, but don’t want to bother me. I’m happy when they do decide to approach me with their questions, which are always respectful, or at least innocent.

Many Muslims, however, have given me a very hard time, and are at times embarrassed to be seen with me. In their minds, all the midwestern non-Muslim white people around us think bad things about me for wearing hijab. But I was a midwestern non-Muslim white person before converting, so I know what’s in their minds is mostly their self-conscious imagination. I’ve never met a non-Muslim who had issues with it.

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juliette

I am a hispanic woman living in the USA and have been thinking of converting :]

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zeinab

hi…im from iran…
in iran some muslims wear hijab and some others dont.they respect each other.
a feeeeew people who r lowbrow and close mind hurt people who wear hijab.it is about muslims or nonmuslims.

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Mariam ^^

Assalamu Alaikum,

First of all, I would like to start by expressing a warm thank you to all the non-muslims that have commented positively in this section and shown their acceptance towards women who wear hijab. It gave me tears to read your comments :) Thank you again (I also invite the administrators to send them a special thank you email).

Indeed, although I agree with the fact that we get more comments from muslims than from non-muslims, but many non-muslims are still prejudiced against hijabi women. However, I do not blame them as the media is somehow commiting itself to give a bad image about Islam. For instance, free newspapers are distibuted daily here in London where I live and almost whenever I read one I find a negative article about Islam or muslims.
So I think our duty is to try to clarify the principles of Islam such as Hijab so that they know the real reason behind it and not the one that the media tell them.

Having said that, through my experience it is all about how you behave yourself. If you smile and behave politely and in a friendly manner people will do the same. So smile :) and don’t take people’s comment to heart because at the end of the day it’s Allah (swt) opinion that counts ;)

Wassalam

Mariam

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GiaGia

These muslim women are submissive slaves to their abusive male muslim relatives!!!!!!

How DARE anyone tell me I have to cover my entire body and walk around like a fool with all that extra fabric. Not even to mention what it must be like in the 90 degree heat, these women are DESPERATE for a man, and have NO self esteem, hopeless.

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Muslima

GiaGia, really, why’d you post when you only have ignorance to display?

No one ‘tells’ Muslim women what to do, and definitely not our relatives! I wear my hijab out of my own choice, and I ONLY submit and am a slave to GOD, which is what the world Islam literally means, ‘submission to God’. No man has the power to force me to do anything. And I also cover out of self-respect and esteem, because I respect myself enough not to display myself like a piece of meat in a grocer’s window just for men. A woman who covers herself is showing that she isn’t a slave to men, to be played aroud with as they please.

And really….does a woman who is desperate for a man hide her body? Twisted thinking…

Not to mention that scientists have proven that people who nake themselves in the sun are susceptible to sunburn and harmful UV rays, as well as frying their skin. Look to the Sahara desert and Africa…people who live there don’t go naked or they would die of heat! Both the men and women are found wrapped in layers of cloth as PROTECTION. I live in Africa. so I should know, as everyday is over 90 degrees here.

GiaGia. please inform yourself more about Muslims before posting again.

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Stella

As for hijab…I am so EXCITED to get to wear it on a daily basis…well I am converting to a muslimah and wearing that for the reason of Allah said so will be a blessing to me and about being obedient to HIS WORD yet I know that I can be creative with them & I am already wearing wrap because as I DON’T like doing my hair on a daily basis..yet about the HAIR that is an outward appearance of women today..its about how a man truly will respect you with a hijab on is what its truly about…Salamu alaykum

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mya

I am muslim and do not wear a hijab and never will, I feel there is no need for it and THAT is just my personal choice. I think someone here said ” A woman who covers herself is showing that she isn’t a slave to men, to be played aroud with as they please”. So does this mean if a woman does Not cover herself it means that she is a slave to men? and to be played around with ? If so, than this is definitely a twisted mind of thinking! If any man does not respect a woman PERIOD! WITHOUT HIJAB OR WITH, IS NO MAN AT ALL!!!! If someone does not respect a muslim that does not wear the hijab , than they are Ignorant people.

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zaida

Mya

I agree, many muslims say bad things because I do not cover and that hurts. I love my religion but dont feel the need to cover.

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Sarah

Assalaamu Alaikum Sisters,

My name is Sarah, and I’m an American-borm Muslim living in Chicago. Im fourteen years old soon to fifteen, and I’m entering the ninth grade as a freshman. Inshallah the first day of school will be the day I begin wearing hijab officially. I’ve actually been asking around in my non-muslim friends whether or not it would bother them (As if their responses were completely entitled to my decision haha) so far no one has seemed to have a problem with it, although one of my friends has said it would be difficult. I know of only two hijabi girls in my class and one of them had only wore her hijab for half the year of eighth grade because people were teasing her. I am scared of what it will be like for me but my friends are supportive and tell me any decision I make I’ll still be class Valedictorian. I give my faith to Allah swt. and Inshallah it will be made easy for me. I must admit it was very fun getting my outfits ready for the first-day of school. I used to wear short-sleeves shirts alot and that means it ususally ended inches off of my shoulder, but I bought sweaters and long-sleeved cardigans to pair up with outfits, and I have many hoodies, in which I should be comfortable. My high school is fairly large and I’m sure their will be a large number of side way glances and outright staring so is there any advice you all can give me? Inshallah I know it will be a decison I will never regret. I hope to obtain an occupation in the medical business and would happily input muslim women into society.

It is all for the sake of Allah.

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Rachida

Walaikum Salaam Sarah,

Mashallah sister I’m very happy for you and I pray that allah makes it easy for you and you keep going inshallah. I don’t think you need much advice…what you are doing seems great.
May allah bless you.

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Heba

I can’t say I recognize the problems raised in Z’s statement. I really can’t – in fact I find people go out of their way to accommodate girls with scarves.

I live in europe and athough I don’t wear a headscarf and have no intention to do so, I don’t think this should influence other people and their choice. My problem is not with what people wear or not, but rather the lack of tolerance extended to those who interpret the Qur’an differently. I also oppose the narrowminded catagorization between scarf wearing girls and those without.

Many ulema and average muslims distinguish the former as being pure and worthy of respect whereas the other group are defined as unworth of respect or as some put it, immoral or just plain whores. Yet nobody finds this insulting. A picture of a lollipop has been widely circulated among muslims trying to mission the “importance” of the scarf. Two lollipops, one has its cover on while the other does not and is turn surrounded by insects. This is insulting and intolerance at its best. I have a problem with this.

So some muslimg females who don’t wear headscarves, burka, niqab – are simply saying they don’t agree it to be a command from Allah for the variety of reasons given: humility, fear of Allah, lack of sexual exposure etc. This does not mean they are less worthy of respect or immoral.

I personally believe Allah is much more tolerant than the average muslim. In the Quran Hijab is mentioned a handful of times, but nowhere in context with a woman’s dresscode or headgear or such.

Modesty is subject to the context, time and environment we live in. Certainly a female can be modest without a headscarf.

Somebody asked why females can’t be fashionable while wearing a headscarf? Assuming the position of the scarf, fashion would not exactly collaborate with the idea of being respected for ones mind rather than ones femininity or female attributes be that perfectly plucked eye brows or slim fit jeans. It contradicts the entire condition of headscarves og modesty. This is an observation many make both muslims but also non-muslims.

So before we start demanding tolerance of others to let us dress as we deem fit, then the same tolerance of interpretation and understanding ones faith on an indvidual level, should be extended muslim to muslim. Even when we dont understand each other or don’t agree.

Or else it becomes an empty one-sided victim statement. Tolerance is both ways. Not oneway. Same goes for respect.

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Shaday

Hello i live in a state called pennsylvania in the USA. I am not muslim im actually christian.But i really love the hijab! I think that women who wear them are brave and proud of their religion and the life styles they have chosen.I have encountered some muslim women who dont wear hijab and it always surprises me,but i always say to each his own,or her in this case.

As for me i love the hijab and i even did an experiment when i went on a shopping trip to New york city. The first day in NYC i didnt wear a hijab i wore my hair out,with a tshirt and skinny jeans. And men would stare and remark,some even tried to stop me to talk to me and ask for my name and number. So the next day i put on a hijab long sleeve and loose flare jeans. The change in the mens manner was amazing! They greeted me with the muslim greeting, they would not stare at me, or try to talk to me! At one store some women in hijab where shopping,and one turned to me and said “sister do you think this looks to tight?”. It was an incredible experience for me.

And i didnt get any evil stares or bad comments. I still wear hijab now,although it can be confusing for some people when they ask if im muslim and i say im not.But they are very excepting when i tell them that the reason that i wear it and the style of clothes to go with it ,is because i actually enjoy the modest apperal and the respect i recieve while in it.

So for the sisters that dont wear the hijab,that is a personal choice,yes.But you should always be proud of what you are.And as a muslim women wearing your hijab and going to college or working at your career ,you are paving a way for other muslimas to come into the world wearing their hijabs,and being proud of it!

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Lindsey M

I am not a muslim but I am very intrigued by the arab world. My boyfriend is from the Middle East and we have had discussions over whether or not I should wear the hijab. I am fascinated by it! I think they are very pretty and kind of wish I had one to wear when I am out with him. As a white, american young woman, I think they are very cool. Do not be ashamed of the hijab! Wear it proudly!

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Tania

Asalamalaykom all:) Alhamdollilah, I am a revert to Islam and I wear the hijab. Sisters, only Allah (Swt) knows what i in our hearts and we should all be supportive to each other to keep our ummah strong. I have had expereinces wear my family was not so accepting at first, did not like the idea of hijab, I have been told by others that I am a traitor because I reverted to this beautiful deen (alhamdollilah), I have been stared at, etc. I have also received supportive comments and I look at all of this as a blessing from Allah (Swt) because it makes me stronger. Inshallah, I will never take off my hijab – no matter what! I observe hijab to please Allah (Swt) and it is my protection – wallahi! Let us all be supportive and good to each other and may Allah (Swt) guide the sisters who don’t observe hijab – because it is truly so wonderful to wear it and I have never felt anything like it, alhamdollilah:)

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Iranian hijabi

Hi! I’ve really enjoyed your websites and just had a quick comment about this post. The picture you’re using is of 2 Iranian girls who seem to be wearing hijab “incorrectly.” I agree that their hijab is flawed but these are girls who have been forced by the Iranian government to wear hijab and when something is forced to those who don’t believe it, this will be the reaction we should expect from them. Quite honestly, I feel much better wearing hijab in America than in Iran simply because I wear it as a choice here but in Iran I’m surrounded by ladies who’re doing it because they have no other choice and it breaks my heart. Hijab is beautiful and it’s sad to see it forced as it is in Iran.

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shobeyr

ok.brother and sister salamun alaykum va rahmatullah va barakatuh.
i want to say some thing .
if you dont read “nahjulbalaqah”until now.please read it.
understand this book is not easy.but tavakkaltu alallah.. and read it.it is the best way of being a real muslim.bellah.
start it
read it

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Busana Muslim Modern

I’m very agree with you sis,
many of muslimah said, that jilbab can make her hair fall..
besides, jilbab make our body more pleasent and health..
so, this is a big responsible for us. to tell our family and friend
that islam is beautiful and pleasent
which, make our life good than before

thanks

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From Spain

Hi!
I’m a non-Muslim (and non-Christian) girl from Spain and I’ll tell you my point of view on the matter:

Most of us don’t like hijab here, but the truth is no one will tell you this (I’m talking about daily life in a non-working area).
We tend to respect everybody’s clothes but the main words I hear from my friends and relatives (and myself as well) when we see someone wearing a hijab are:

- Probably she’s being forced to wear it, not necessarily knowing that she is. It’s a part of the Muslim culture and she won’t feel accepted by her peers if she doesn’t wear it.

- It’s amazing how women have always to sacrifice themselves and men don’t have to wear such an outfit.

- In non-Muslim countries you’re standing out of the crowd and can suffer racist assaults, comments and looks. Everybody will look at you and say “Look at that, she’s a Muslim”.

- Men can’t control themselves and that’s why they have to cover their hair (or even faces and more parts of the body)? Come on, are we more animals than animals?

- Is it healthy to be so covered under the scorching sun? (After seeing many women in Brussels wearing jeans, kurtas, cardigans and the hijab).

As I’ve said before, this is what most of people think: women are under men control and that’s why they have to cover themselves. But most of the people here won’t say anything directly to the person wearing the hijab. We respect it, even though we don’t like it that much.

In any case, I think it’s important anyone wearing a hijab (or any other piece of clothes related to a religious belief) does it freely, because she thinks it’s right and not because people assume she has to do it. The way you dress is a personal choice and NO ONE should force you to change that.

Best regards from Spain.

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ssg

I live in the U.S., and my family is non-muslim. I have worn hijab since I converted and have gotten WAY more negative comments about it from non-muslims. Most muslims will not say negative things about my hijab to my face (though I have seen lots of discussions in online forums where muslim women discuss why they do not wear the hijab, and are negative toward those who do or anyone who suggests it’s obligatory).
I think the main misconceptions from non-muslims, at least based on what they said are: someone is forcing me to wear it, or it’s because men can’t control themselves (we all know that’s not true and that men also have a code of dress).

However I’ve also gotten a fair number of comments from muslim men which I find offensive, not because they dislike the hijab but because they automatically assume that I’m married and that is why I wear the hijab, or I started wearing it when I was married, or converted when I was married. Do they not think I have a mind of my own?

Some muslim sisters who do not wear hijab have also told me they have gotten a lot of negative comments from sisters who do cover, pressuring them to wear it. This in fact makes them resist wearing it more. We need to remember that there is no coercion in religion… the act is meaningful because you do it based on our faith, not because someone forces you to do so.

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mariaconvertie

I Lived in France and it is very difficult to wearing hijab in this country… Muslim are discriminated by the politics and many people in the country. French people are against hijab. I’m a white women and a man in the street say to me “Oh no yo wear hijab too? Nooo” Many people desagree hijab. They considered that like a provocation in a laïc country…. You can’t work if you wearing hijeb, you can’t go to school with your hijab … You can’t have a normal life… Because hijab it considred like a soumission for women…

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Maria

. I live in a predominantly white christian area and started wearing the hijab when I was 12 yrs old. My mother doesn’t wear the hijab (although she does dress modestly) so though she tried she couldn’t give me the support I felt I

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Maria

sorry…i made a mistake typing :)… needed. Although I am now growing more comfortable in my hijab, I do feel that many people tend to stare at me (even Muslims), and at times this does make me want to hide away in a corner and back away from daily life. I find that ‘forums’ like this give a sense of support for girls like me who do at first struggle with criticism from both Muslims and Non-Muslims. I am now a proud hijabi (alhamdulillah) Thankyou :)

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Ameenah Yasin

I have been reading the comments on the Hijab and I wanted to say that at 35 I have decided to come back to Islam, I was born into Islam but I never really practiced it fully, I stopped when I was about 18 or so, I recently started to cover again and It was not an easy decision, I am An African-american woman, and in this society it is not easy to wear your Hijab. I have made some changes to my clothing, but my intended husband feels like I should be wearing a Jilbab. I do not think that it is required to wear a Jilbab since I do have everything coverd and I am dressing in a modest fashion, I mean does it make me less of a muslimah beacuse I do not wish to wear a Jilbab daily? It is my understanding that Allah (swt) knows your true intentions and if my intention is to cover and be modest then what is the problem? I was wondering what other sisters views were in this issue?

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Edith

Salaam! I’ve been reading many comments and I like the hijab because it demonstrates modesty and a demand for respect, but quite often when I meet another muslimah who does not wear the hijab I get many compliments and they express their feelings about negative comments from others. We must support each other and encourage each to cover modestly. Let us save our daughters from the current state of society around the world. Alhamdulilah!

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amir

in iran most of girls dont like hijab but they have to do that because of dictatorship
of islam

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Noor

I am a high school girl living in America. I started wearing the hijab this year and am so happy! I have always wanted to wear the hijab and am thankful that Allah gave me the courage to start wearing it. I have an older sister who is almost eighteen, but she does not wear the hijab. She also does not dress very modestly, and wears short sleeves and has worn shorts. How can I convince her, besides being an example, to wear the hijab and be more modest? Any ideas would be appreciated.

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Noor

PLEASE LEAVE COMMENTS FOR MY EMAIL ABOVE………..I REALLY WANT TO HELP MY SISTER AND LEAD HER TOWARDS THE RIGHT PATH….THANKS

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ARIFAH

I am living in indonesia and work at tobacco estate. I wearing hijab since I was in college until now. I think every muslimah have rights to use hijab or not, but if we realize that our religion teach us to cover our body it will be more better to do it. BECAUSE hijab make me more safe specially at my work and it’s beautiful look like. The most important is I more trust to my self to do anything the best at my work.

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zeinab

hello every body!!
i am from iran. i am a muslim girl and i am proud of it. i am a born muslim, and i wore hijab when i was 9 years old! oh, i am 19 years old.
actually in iran, all of girls and women wear hejab. but some of them wear it bad. i mean some of them( they are very few)their hair is out of their scarf. and islam dont like this.
but a large number about 80% of iranian girls and women wear hijab very well!!!!
IRANIAN GIRLS ARE PERFECT!!!!!
i love hijab, and i wear CHADOR.
I NEVER CHANGE MY CHADOR WITH ANY THING ELSE!!!!!!!

send a SALAVT to imam MAHDI alaihe salam.

i love all of you. my muslim sisters :)

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naima

SAlam sister i really want to put my hijjab on…i am embarrased to say i am muslim because i dont wear a hijjab i am starting to pray all my prayers elhamdylilah and inshallah allah will help m,e and guide and give me strengths i was born a muslim but only by words the religion was not practiced strictly in that country which i really dont want ot mention Salam sisters i love this website abd u guys have amazing taste

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Jase

Maybe women who choose not to wear the hijab Just.Plain.Dont.Like.It?

Maybe they choose NOT to wear it…because they simply dont want to. End of story.

Who defines modesty? In Islam there is a definition in the Quoran, but that only applies to those who believe in Islam. In mormonism there is another one established by mormon culture and the book of mormon…and let’s face it, that won’t fly with the Baptists. General political conservatives (preppies) have another and in Amish and Mennonite circles there is a different one completely…who is right?

Short-sleeved T-shirts are ok in mormonism but not in Islam. Tank tops are ok in Episcopalians but not in mormonism. Jeans are ok in Catholicism but not in Orthodox Jews. Dancing is ok in most religions but immodest for Southern Baptists. Some women are ok in bikinis but others think public nudity in beaches are ok.

We can go on and on about this.

There is nothing wrong in having a different opinion and there isn’t only ONE way of doing things.

It’s about time people stop judging others on BOTH sides of the argument. Be proud of who you are and what to wear, but don’t judge others for having a different opinion. Because they’re right too.

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Sidra

ameenahyasin–yes you are right!! In Islam, you have to dress modestly but it does not say that you have to choose the dress of a specific culture. For example, many Pakistani women wear shalwar kameez and meet the modesty requirement. So you can wear American clothes and do the same. Perhaps your husband goes to a predominantly Arab mosque and wants you to meet that image. Don’t make it seem like he “lost” though, because then your clothes will become an ego issue.

Spain–i liked how you posted your thoughts honestly yet not rudely.I am Muslim but I sort of agree with u :x I am not hijabi though.

P.S. Admins, is there a way we can comment directly under someone else’s post?? Like “comments” on Facebook? That would make it more organized.

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Dhian

Assalamu’alaikum…I live in Indonesia – which is known for the largest number of Moslems in the world. So, hijabis are everywhere across the country. However, I’ve been living in Bali – known to be Island of the Gods, where the majority embraces Hinduism – for 10 years now. I agree when said, “negative comments comes from Moslem. These are their common comments:
- It’s hot enough without a hijab..
- My husband hasn’t approve me wearing hijab..
- The company management doesn’t allow employee wearing hijab, especially those directly handling customer (these happen in tourism-based company)
- Hair fall
- Maybe later when I have grandchildren
- I’m too young to look like moms

But this comment bothers me most:
“What’s important is how you ‘cover’ your heart (qolbi). Hijab is just an outfit/costume. Why do we wear hijab if we’re still gossiping around, talk behind one’s back..etc. It’s more important to ‘wear hijab in our heart’…”

Well, wearing hijab and gossiping, are two different subject.
One who is wearing a hijab has fulfill her obligation, and that should be +10 point (per day?). And when she’s gossiping, that’s -1 point. Total says 9 point
One who is not wearing hijab, -1 point (/day?). And she’s not gossiping (I never met a woman who doesn’t gossip, even the tiniest gossip), I’m not sure there’s a point in this one (unless, she advises people around her to stop gossiping, that should be +10). So, total -1 point?

So, if one doesn’t want to wear hijab, let’s not use this last comment as a reason…coz, that’s shows how one’s clearly making it up.

Wassalam

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Noori

Dhian, I happen to agree with you…….. while it is important not to gossip about people and hold bad thoughts in your head about them, it is also a woman’s duty to cover her body, which will help keep her safe from gazes of men who may wish her harm

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Fartun

I used to wear Hijab since my puberty and it was almost like “becasue everyone in my family wears it, I should”. There was no problem there. But when I immigrated to Canada with my family, I stopped wearing it mostly because I heard people(mostly from my country) saying that I’d be isolated and I’d be treated badly. But then I realized that I don’t feel comfortable and I’m too shy around people. Also I made friends with 2 amazing girls from my country who wore Hijab and were pretty comfortable with it, even one of them was head of a English club in our school and everyone respected her very nicely. So I knew it was time for me to wear it again. And it’s been almost 3 years and I feel great! Now I realize that I understand the concept of Hijab and it’s no longer because of somebody! And everyone around me (now I’m in college) respect me for who I am and what choices I make. The only thing that sometimes bothers me is the people from my country who see me and give me a dirty look as if I’ve commited some kind of a crime! I know it’s due to the polictics in my country and an awful government we have which force women to cover themselves otherwise you’d end up in jail( I’m guessing now you know where I come from!!) but it’s not fair to me! I chose to wear the Hijab and I’m not related to any government! Other than this, I’m happy and comfortable with wearing hijab and I thank God who helped me find who I really want to be.
Thank you!

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Nelli

assalamu aleikum,

maybe it’s not too late for a comment. I am a comitted christian, but I respect everyone’s faith. I was I Morocco for several weeks, and I decided to wear a hijab during my time there to show respect to Moroccan people. Noone forced me, it was my desicion. I think respecting others is very important. First I thaught that Muslim women will have bad feelings about this, but no, everyone was very kind to me. I see that modesty and modest dressing is very important in Islam (and I think I understand why, and I agree), so it is not a big effort to make people around you feel comfortable.

I think hijab is beautiful, inspirating, and I found it very comfortable as well. Hijabi ladies, be proud of your religion, heritage, culture, and may Allah bless you all.

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Nelli

sorry for incorrect written words, it is very late here in Hungary :)

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Fatima

Asalamu Alaykum,

I don’t think I had Muslim women make comments to me about Hijab, but ever since I started to wear the Niqab, I’ve had many negative comments from Muslims, both men and women. some stare even more than non-Muslims, which is so irritating and confusing. Most of them say and ask, why put yourself through hardship? Why it’s only sunna? and I was even told more than once that the Niqab has absolutely nothing to do with Islam, and is only a tradition of the Arabs.

It’s frustrating and disheartening to be so unsupportive and judgmental.

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tanya farook

I don’t agree with not getting negative comments from non muslims about the hijab.
Try getting a job and then see. Western non muslims won’t say anything to your face

Extremist wouldn’t be happy seeing a women in a hijab, they would like to see them in a burkha. I think its really problem with the men..Go to Dubai you will see arab house wifes fully coverd up, while next to them walkes a short skirt suited westerern women working for a western company walk past . Thats strange to see..

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MuslimAct

It depends on your level of discourse. If you’re looking at personal experiences, then of course it’s less likely that many of us have had direct instances of discrimination in certain Western nations (I’m writing from Canada). However, when we look at certain political discourse (France, Germany, and here in Canada in the province of Quebec), or even certain colonial-type feminist discourse (such as those who seek to ‘liberate’ the women of Afghanistan by promoting a neo-colonial state under the control of the US government) then there are many voices (both non-Muslim and Muslim) that speak out on hijaab/niqab. Muslim women’s voices – from those who believe in wearing it to those who disagree that it is a Islamic injunction – have banded together to fight such discrimination and state patriarchy, promoting the religious freedoms of the individual. It is therefore not easy to say who speaks out against hijab; there are Muslims and non-Muslims who have different allegiances, understandings, and causes that place them on both sides of the debate.

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soneeta

hi,my name is soneeta and i am 20 i want to wear hijjab i wear hijjab for a long time but i am confused i dont khow what to do cause when i go out poeple r looking to me very badly and plz help me who ever read this comment i want to make my hair my hair is going to be destroyed help me plz i need help thanks plzzz am i have to do hijjab or no i dont khow and i am in canada plz help me thanks again

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Waheeda Khalfan

Hi ,

Some muslim women are forced to wear hijab and this truth needs to be brought out also , I was forced to wear hijab as a child and i resented it. (I wore it from age of 13 till 22) when I went to graduate school and was no longer relying on my parents for financial support, I stopped wearing the hijab then and that has been the best most wonderful decision I have made! When I see other Muslim women wearing it, I do wonder if its by choice or if its forced. Given my own experience, I hope you can understand why I would wonder this.

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Anonymous

hi,
i think mostly the reason people stare is because they find those in a hijab or niqab mystical.i love the way the niquab frames the eyes and the hijab the face.i tried out the hijab many times and didnt find it anywhere near uncomfortable if it is pinned up right.though i may like to say that many people are against women wearing the hijaba and niquab .my mums is of the opinion that the hijabs nice but the niquab closes of the the person to the world.and i may agree with it.because i have seen many of my cheerful muslim friends become dull after putting it on (most were forced by their parents to wear it).but the hijabs cooooooool i have got a good example of my teacher she is a muslim wears a hijab an over coat which reaches till the knees but has such an outgoing charecter you just simply love her.i think its upto a women to decide weather she wants to wear te hijab or not(im not with the niquab)

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Asmaa

I’m actually about to start wearing the hijab tomorrow inshallah and I’m very nervous about it…I had a near death experience and promised Allah that I would wear it if my family and I came back alive, which we did alhamdullah…I don’t know why I feel like I don’t want to wear it (it’s crossed my mind several times); of course I will because I want to keep my promise, but did anyone feel this way when they first wore the hijab and if anyone did, please give me advice on how you handled it?

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:)

Hi everyone. I decided to wear the hijab a day before ramadan this year. I had originally planned for my hijab wearing to coincide with the new school term a week later but a few days before ramadan, i had a strong inclination to wear it so i decided to wear it when i had a meeting in my university.

So far, i’ve mostly gotten curious questions but many people ask me if my parents have forced me to do it. but once i explain to them my reasons, they just nod their heads and i hope they understand the reason behind the hijab. I told my best friend who is non-muslim while i was still contemplating about it and she just told me “if it feels right just do it” which gave me more strength. One particularly upsetting incident was when one of my guy friends told me to stop wearing the hijab because he thought i was prettier before it. he even called me to let me know what he thought. we don’t talk as often now anymore.

besides that incident, i haven’t had any more negative comments, alhamdullilah. my boyfriend thinks i’m a lot prettier now, which is a good thing.

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yasmin

Smiley face, or whoever you are, it is very good that you decided to wear a hijab, but it is wrong that you have guy friends. Women in islam should not even talk to men who are not relatives, and you have a guy friend telling you how you look? What kind of muslim are you if you have a boyfriend?

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renita burwell

Yasmin, Practice your deen and let other folks practice theirs. You have no idea what kind of relationship Smiley has with her boyfriend.

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Aina

Women are allowed to talk to men in Islam, even if they’re not related. Ai’sha RA (the Prophet’s wife) relayed hadiths to the companions after the Prophet SAW’s death. That should be the guideline. No flirting, no empty talks (as with Muslim women). Don’t impose such a restriction on yourself when it’s not even correct.

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Zainub

Asmaa, I would like to praise you very much for deciding to wear the hijab. Do not have second thoughts about it, it should be something you want to do from the heart, to protect yourself. I wish you luck in your future.

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Asmaa

Salam Zainab:

Thanks for the advice sister; so far it’s day four of me wearing the Hijab and at times, it is challenging, but for the most part, it’s quite nice; I think I need to get used to it; the concept of me now being a Hijabi is still quite new to me; it’s going to take a while to get used to…

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Shahirah Elaiza

I started wearing the hijab almost 7 months ago and it’s been a wonderful experience, alhamdulillah. I’ve never been happier in my life! Asma, I just wrote two entire posts about my experience if you want to know more about how I handled wearing hijab in a Western country =) I hardly face criticism from anyone but that’s maybe because I am very open about why I started wearing hijab and I kind of encourage my non-Muslim friends to talk to me about it and ask questions. Maybe it’s also because Allah swt wanted to make it easy for me as it wasn’t an easy decision for me to make at first.

I just wanted to respond to Yasmin’s comment:
Your comment is the type that pushes non-Muslims away from Islam and it doesn’t help struggling Muslims either. Saying things like that make you sound really judgemental even if that wasn’t your intention. I understand where you are coming from but interaction between guys and girls is allowed as long as both sides know their limits and have no ill intentions. Speaking to a guy doesn’t necessarily mean having a boyfriend. He could be a classmate, for example.

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Shahirah Elaiza

Oh and it’s really nice to be reading all these positive comments about hijab from all over the world! Islam is so universal and I wish more people could see that.

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Muslima

Yasmine,

Please, this site is not for bashing others. We all have our different views and interpretations on Islam, and Smiley merely said that she has a friend. Who happens to be a guy. Not a boyfriend. Please judge yourself before judging others. Jazakillahukhairan.

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Muslima

Yasmine,

Please do not bash others. We all have our different views and interpretations on Islam, and Smiley merely said that she has a friend who is a guy, not a boyfriend.

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Yasmin

I am really sorry. I did not mean to bash others muslima, but if you look at what smiley face wrote she said,” my boyfriend thinks i’m a lot prettier now.”So she said she has a guy friend and a boyfriend and that is wrong. If someone has a different view on Islam that does not mean that they can completely ignore something that Allah(swt) told them not to do, and in the Quran women are told that they should not look at or speak to non-blood related men, so there is a lot wrong with what smiley face is doing! I can only hope that she understands that what she is doing is haram, and follow the straight path.

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Rabbia

I guess that i am probably the last person who will comment on this blog, and I would like to conclude that it is important that women understand the reason that they must wear hijab. Women are precious jewels like diamonds and pearls, both of which are hard to uncover and both for which people go to great depths to find. Therefore, women must cover up their body and their hair, for they are more precious than jewels, and should be respected for who they are, not used for their body. Women are told to stay away from men who are not blood related to protect them, therefore they should not speak to men and especially should not have guy or boyfriends. I wish everyone good luck in their lives and hope that everyone will find the right way, the way to Allah. May all Muslims unite to become better and find themselves a place in heaven.

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Leire

I’m from Spain and actually I think that what worries Western Countries is the burka or the niquab, not really the hijab. Women (and men!) covered their heads in Europe not so long ago after all. The hijab is related to religion and values and that is fine. The niquab though is another kind of story… because the meaning it carries is quite different.

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mary

I wanted to post to say that in my school of approximately 1,000 catholic girls, one muslim girl who had been living in here in Ireland all her life was given the choice by her parents as to whether or not she wanted to wear the hijab. She decided to adopt it in her teens as she said she wanted to feel closer to her islamic culture. By living in Ireland so long, she felt she had missed out on a lot of Islamic culture and, in a way, had lost a part of herself. The day she came into school wearing it, I can genuinely say I have never seen such an outpouring of support, from pupils and teachers alike. People told her she was brave for wearing it and that they were proud of her. I have to say i don’t think it is “brave” necessarily to wear the hijab, but there is so much hijab-bashing nowadays I believe it was noble, moreso, to wear the hijab.

By the way, I’m not a hijab wearer, I’m moving to UAE soon and was looking up middle-east style- this came up so i wanted to contribute!

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farrah

I am to a proud african american muslim I love my hijab its unique it matchs my personility
wwith the way im feeling I will never give it up idk how what anyone has to say because at the end of the day we all will,meet allah (swt) and he is the best of judging ameen..

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Amerah

Wallahi what the sister said is not Hijab is sooo true. I agree 100000% :)

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Rabbia

who said what amerah?

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Forouhar23

I think that whoever posted this article, should have taken into account the impact that pictures can have. The pictures next to the article were taken in Iran, so people will assume that the Iranian people are muslims, but in fact, a lot of them are not. The problem is, however, that the Iranian state is not secular, so that women are enforced by the government to cover up. But a lot of Iranian women, however, don’t even consider themselves to be muslimas, so how could you claim that muslimas are ashamed
of their hijab, and then show a picture of Iranian women, while they are not muslimas?!
Kind regards,
Forouhar23

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Rabbia

That’s true….. I didn’t even think about that

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Natasha

Here is something that hijab wearing ladies need to be careful about: visiting muslim friends who do not wear hijab. I wear hijab and I feel that muslim ladies who do not wear it see me as a poor mezquina, and who knows for what other motive, maybe even jealousy, would do anything to try to get it off me! One lady, whom I visited at her parents house, told me to take everything off, assuring me there were no men at home. So, I took off the abaya, leaving the hijab on my head. While we were having tea of course her brother and friend entered the house. Of course, I was sitting there with bare arms (up to my elbows anyway) and a covered head. She did not apologize and I felt like the victim of a practical joke, knowing that she is muslim but really does not like hijab. Soon after, the same woman invited me to her home. I gave her a second chance, this being a different house, and took off the hijab. She told me that her husband was coming home soon, but, not to worry, he would be in the other room. Of course, soon he was standing in the door of the room I was in, in the awkward position of trying to pretend he wasn’t seeing me with out the hijab. My advise, if you wear a hijab, choose friends that do too, and don’t believe people when they tell you no one is home.

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Forouhar23

No problem, I just wanted to point this out to you.
Kind regards,
Forouhar 23

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Rabbia

but still there are muslim women who do not care to wear a hijab and do not care about being modest…some just want to be western and don’t care about what it means to be a muslim

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Neila

Salam alikoum,

I was born in France and I live in Paris. I’m 29 years old. Honestly, my parents did not give me a muslim education (or the very few: ramadhan and… ramadhan!). I can say that I “discovered” Islam not alone but through some people I met in a foreign (not muslim…) country. My Turkish friend did not hesitate to wear it, but as far as I’m concerned, it seems very complicated. For only one reason: the reaction of my parents. They won’t approve it! And I’m not ready to fight against them today. Maybe in some years, when I get married, I don’t know. But today, I can’t. Inchallah it will be soon.

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Forouhar23

I agree that there are muslims who try to become more western, and therefore, leave
their hijab behind.

But can you state that a veiled girl, who wears a lot of makeup and flashy-tight fitting clothes is more faithful to islam than a non-veiled girls that tries to cover her body shape more?

Since I live in a big, multicultural European city, I see every sort of interpretation of faith, such as the ‘categories’ I described above.
In both cases, if their decision is only based on ‘becoming’ more western, both of them are wrong, the veiled girl just as much as the non-veiled one.

I think it is a a shame that some muslims think hijab and modernity do not go well with each other. I think they have adapted the western attitude towards religion, namely that religion equals decay and ignorance. This is partly because in Europe, religion was already fading away when modernity was introduced, so the assumption was quickly made that the two just don’t mix and match.

As a conclusion, it is important to remember that we, humans, cannot judge other beings. Only God can do so.

Kind Regards,
Forouhar 23

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Rabbia

of course, that it true…. only Allah knows who is good and who is not and it is not necessarily our place to judge them. Living in America, I can say that there are so many different type of Muslims, including ones who don’t even want to be attached to their religion, some who wear tank tops and short sleeves under hijab, and others who wear a hijab, yet behave in the manner of a non-muslim. I think that if parents gave their daughters a good education and taught them why it was important to be modest and wear a hijab, it might evoke positive feelings in women about covering themselves rather than resenting it.

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Forouhar23

I think that is true. Actually, I think that there are only 2 options: either you wear it, properly, or either you don’t. You can’t make the choice for only 50%.

Maybe you’re right, maybe the parents have also become more ‘western’ and don’t bother to explain their daughters that Hijab is a way of protecting yourself, and protecting society. Maybe, secretly, they also want their dauhters to become more western, because they too believe that religion and succes do not go hand in hand in a modern western world.

But not wearing does not automatically mean that you are a bad person. So, what do you mean by ‘good education’? Just teaching your daughters the values of modesty and hijab? Personally, I feel that good education is a lot more than that. Good education, to me, means that you are a good person to everyone around you, from the heart, not because you will go to heaven then.

I’m actually a bit bothered by the fact that sometimes the hijab seems to be the number 1 priority of a muslim. I think a muslim’s priority is to become a good person. To me, honouring God does not only show in a piece of cloth, honouring God is about helping, understanding and loving people unconditionally.If you can genuinely feel this from the heart, to me, you are a believer. As you actually imply, you can still wear a veil, but deceive everyone, because you are not a believer from the heart.

Religion is about love, for God, but also for the people around you, because they are also part of His creation. That is our main duty: to help, to love, to understand. Hijab is a part of showing your love to God, but as you imply, wearing it, without loving God, just doesn’t make sense.

I don’t know about you guys, but here in Europe, it’s Eid!
So, Eid mubarak!

Kind regards,
Forouhar23

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Jana

Salam aleikum, sisters.
I am a revert from central Europe, Slovakia. I ve been muslimah for like one year now, I am not wearing a hijab, but I want to. Sometimes I feel like: don´t worry, it will be fine, it will be great… and the other time: no.. I will lost my job, I will have problems at my university and with society… I have to wait, it´s better… At my faculty nobody wears hijab…
Pls, if any sister with experiences like this could advise me…
Masalamah

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CanadianMuslim

Salam,
I’m a muslim girl wearing the hijab, I started wearing the hijab when I started highschool. I also didnt attend any ordinary highschool, i attended a Catholic high school. I guess I made the wearing of the hijab harder on myself, but i enjoyed answered questions that the students and teachers asked.

I feel that the hijab is a way of identifying yourself as a muslim, aside from the modest dressing and behaviour. By wearing the hijab (in the right way) to me you are saying “im a muslim and I am proud of it.” And why shouldn’t we be proud? Yes, it is a commitment to wear the hijab physically, and yes you may get looks from others. But of you discover you friends can’t accept you for who you are, obviously you are hanging out with the wrong crowd! The hijab makes it easier to make the right friends – we end up communicating with those who respect you and your beliefs.

Sure, many say that just because some muslims choose not to wear the hijab, it doesnt mean that they are less pious. But i dont understand why they would not like to be recognized as a muslim, why dont they want to represent their ummah? If they were rightous muslims they would want to wear the hijab to further protray modest behaviour and to stand along side their muslim sisters.

It upsets me when non-muslims come to me and ask “so and so is a muslim, why doesnt she wear the hijab?” I have to reply “she doesnt want to, or she is not comfortable with it” and this makes the non-muslims confused and makes it seem as though the muslims are confused and dispute against their own religion. :(

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Rabbia

@ Forouhar23- Khair Mubarak, and to all my muslim brothers and sisters Eid Mubarak:)

I did not mean to imply that any muslim woman who does not wear a hijab is a bad muslim or that hijab is the number 1 priority of a muslim. I just believe that if a muslim truly understands Islam they will recognize the significance of being modest and they will be proud of it.

By good education, I also meant the same thing. If parents thouroughly and completely taught their children Islam and the significance of everything that Allah (swt) asks muslims to do, the children would feel compelled to follow. As you know, everthing from character to the way of living life is detailed in our religion, so if kids had a good education they would know all of that, along with hijab and covering themselves.

Nowadays, a lot of kids don’t listen to their parents and; therefore, I am not going to say that it is completely the parents fault for having children that are behaving westernized. If the children choose not to listen or do what is right, it is them who are at fault.

But back to the topic of hijab, a good muslim woman will understand why she is supposed to cover herself, that’s not saying that a woman who doesn’t cover herself is bad, but she should open heartedly embrace, understand, and follow her religion.

I do agree with you though, a good muslim does not only behave modestly, but is good from the depths of their heart to their very outer surface.

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B

Well said! I definitely agree.
The only people who bash me and tell me negative comments about my Hijab are Muslims!
Some of them even stopped talking to me or be my friend because I wore it – because they think this is how you’re “cool”, “open minded” and “western” while the Non-Muslims show me all respect.
It’s too sad and ironic because I even live in a Muslim country, but I guess people lost their identities nowadays – It’s such a shame.
Think of it, most of us as Muslims don’t have problems with Non-Muslims.
We don’t go around bashing them and insulting them just because they have different beliefs, we try to explain to them and open their eyes instead or should not comment about it. (Notice that I am talking about the good Muslims and how Muslims should actually act so I am not talking about the terrorists or the people who are too close minded because they simply do not represent Islam)
The world has definitely changed… But we should do our best to stay the same and save our religion.

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Amerah

Asalamu Alaykum
It’s not only the fact that Muslims are the ones who are ashamed, but also the fact that other Muslims aren’t reminding them to avoid wrong. When I started high school this year, so many girls I saw wore the Hijab wrong. So when I went up to the (by the way, It wasn’t force, but in a kind matter) I told them about the real hijab and it means modesty, behavior, and how to do it right. One of the sisters said that we should just leave them but Allah Subhanahu Wataalah said to remind one another to do go and remind those to forbid evil. If you ever have doubts, Allah Subhanahu Wataalah has chosen you over the world, famous and rich, to be guided.

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Yasmin

I would like to praise you for trying to help your muslim sisters. May I ask how they were wearing the hijab wrong? Oh and in what country did this occur?
I live in America by the way, so I normally do not see women wearing hijab, I do though.

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Anonymous

Just believe in Islam and follow it. Our religion has all the answers

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Anis :)

I’ve read some of the posts above. Mostly positive. And I have to say it helped me a lot. I live in Malaysia where there are many many Muslims. It is absolutely no problem for me to wear the hijjab here.

And I’d just like to say what you girls are doing is truly inspiring and brave. I think most Malaysian women should read this so they know how easy they have it and still take it for granted.

May Allah bless you all.

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RAFFAELLA

Italy
Back to Islam since abt 1 year
Maybe not all people around me can understand my choice
Wearing hijab make me feel proud to be muslim and to show it
even if every day I cross the other’s people astonished eyes looking at me :
italian girl – wearing hijab – living in a big city – working in a sales office
most of them know that I’m on the right way even if it’s hard to admit

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Kulsoom

Living in an Islamic country, i get more FAQ’S about wearing the hijab and Alhamdulliah, the nigaab from Muslim women. I’m only 15 and i initially started wearing the hijab when i was 11, but when i flipped over to the nigaab, it was like a huge atomic bomb exploded on my head. So many questions, i was overwhelmed. And these questions were and still are negative. It;s really depressing and stupid when Muslims ask questions that non-Muslims have the right to ask and it’s our duty to respond to them. I pray to Allah that He gives them Hidayat and guides them to the right path. Ameen.

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Kulsoom

I forgot to mention my country. I’m from Pakistan.

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W

Its niice reading all these comments its kinda snapped me back into reality. Making me realise the real purpose of wearing a hijab and how i should be proud of wearing it and walking along the straight path. Not doubtin and jus carry on walkin with my held high.
Thanks guy – May Allah bless u all :) x

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Myrriam

I refuse to wear the hijab any longer; except during inclement weather. My mother wore it always and was proud to. I have the benefit of an education. I have read in Ibn Ishaq’s book “The Life of Muhammad” the apostle of Allah prohibited the covering of women, and that it was only after his death that the men of Arabia insisted upon restoring the custom.

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Anonymous

Myrriam, you should not believe events or things that are written in books by people like us who may be mistaken in their beliefs and write things that are not related correctly.

The only words that you can believe are those of Allah revealed to our prophet through the angel Jibrail, and Allah says that women must cover themselves from the gazes of non-blood related men.

Having an education does not mean that you should forget our religion. Wearing a hijab is not restricting you from anything, it is protecting you, so I advise you to understand our religion more, and hopefully realize the significance of wearing hijab.

May Allah help guide you to the right path.

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Malika Abdul-Hakim

Bismillah, it seems to me and Allaah knows best, wearing hijab is a commandment of Allaah that was given to the woman for her protection against the lewdness of society and so that she could be recognized as one of the upright women. I have been around individuals who act as if it is a joking matter of some sort and it truly is not. True Beauty Is In Haya (Modesty). If someone takes issue with hijab and they call themselves muslim then they should examine why they have an issue with it in the first place seeing as though Allaah commanded the woman to cover not man. I hope for all those who struggle with the implementation of wearing Hijab Allaah softens your heart and help you to see the dire need for it to become apart of you.

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Zaitoon Azhar

Masha Allah,
We should all be extremely proud to be muslims! I enjoy wearing my hijaab, because it’s makes me feel proud! Wearing the hijaab, telling the world who you truly and genuinely are. What we believe in and what we’re representing, the Islamic Religion is beautiful. We should be lucky my sisters, to have the gift of being a muslim. I understand that some people feel uncomfortable, but honestly try wearing the hijaab, praying your 5 daily prayers, reading the quran, because the rest is in Allah’s hands. Insha Allah

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Havivah

Hi Kima! I love your blog :)

My friend started a blog that is, well, not related to fashion, but a blog for Muslims and Jews- he discusses similar issues http://jihadiyehudi.blogspot.com/

Maybe you will like it!

Peace to all

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heva

yes, i agree that it comes from muslim women some said to me it is HOT and some says they cannot ENJOY LIFE when wearing a hijab so they will wear a hijab when they are married! i got disgusted when i heared it from them.! and i have friends who are non muslim they just love to see me in wearing a hiab and they want to try it too! ohhhh muslim women awake! wearing a hijab is more beautiful tha a DIAMOND ;) allah bless… SALAM!

im from philippines ;)

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Jennifer

I am not Muslim, but felt I had something I could share here.

I do wear the hijab sometimes because I find it stylish, and I come from a family in Canada that is not Muslim.
I’ve read a few accounts of Muslim women whose family did not accept them after they covered, and this is the opposite of what I’ve found with my completely Christain/Athiest family.
Although it is different for me because I do not always wear the hijab, I was surprised at how little this change affected my family.
Again, I do not always wear the hijab, in fact I am not Muslim, but I thought I should share.

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hana

well seriously yes,i do have the same experience.i have met muslim girls who seem to think that hijab is unnecessary which is kinda disturbing when my non muslim friends have no problem with it.

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sarah

salam alikom every one…..I’m sarah from Algeria….Ido agree with Z’s statment …there are many many girls in my country who just had enough with their hijabs …..and they are trying to do every and any thing to get read of it but they can’t ….well I can’t judge the non muslims because I don’t have much interaction with them…..but all I’can say is ….may ALLAH show them the right path to fellow …and ALLAH bless all those who fellow our prophet MOHAMED ‘s souna……thank you my frinds …muslima wearing my hijab and I’m proud…

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Jessica

I’m not Muslim, but I wear hijab part-time (the winters here are long and cold…). When I don’t, I still cover my head and usually have something large, like a hat or even an old-fashioned bonnet, that covers most of my hair.

Some people (mainly tourists) will avoid looking at me when I wear hijab, but most of my adult friends don’t have a problem with it. But when I wore hijab to school one day, a friend of mine, who is a Muslim who used to wear hijab before I met her, seemed unhappy that I was wearing hijab, since I’m not Muslim.

I’m afraid to say that I haven’t worn hijab to school before or since, as not only did people stare at me more than usual (and there were more glares), but almost everyone I knew who saw me at school that day was telling me that I shouldn’t wear hijab, that I should take it off. (I didn’t at the time, I’m happy to say.)

I’m thinking about wearing hijab to school again, since that was the better part of a year ago.

Salaam.

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siti fara

Assalammua’laikum dear sister

19 years ago the first time I wear hijab,many women didn’t know about it,but now Alhamdulillah in Indonesia from elementary-university and many woman have already wear the hijab

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siti fara

QS:33:59

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Fatimah

Assalamu Alaikum Wa Rahmatullahi Wa Barakatuh: It has been my experience that non-muslims seem to have a problem with my wearing hijab. It is comical and comes across this way: “Aren’t you hot with all those clothes on? Why do you wear that “thing” on your head?” What amazes me is that some people wear wigs on their head, some wear hats on their heads, Nuns cover their heads, and some Jewish women cover their heads so why all the fuss about the hijabs? I have been covering for 11 years now, alhamduallah! I feel so beautiful wearing my hijab and wearing this is very, very important.. It says we proud to be muslim and we seek the pleasure of Allah. That is our hearts desire – to please Allah! As for the muslimah not wanting to obey Allah that will be a matter between them and Allah. Peace to all.

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new balance outlet

hijab, a good muslim woman will understand why she is supposed to cover herself, that’s not saying that a woman who doesn’t cover herself is bad, but she should open heartedly embrace, understand, and follow her religion

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Ana Beh

Hello!
very interesting topic!
I am Brazilian and here there are no Muslims who wear the hijab so I do not know what would be the reaction of people.
There are some Christian nuns who cover their hair and so this is associated with religion.
A while ago, if I saw a girl wearing I would think: poor girl!
But after traveling to other countries and see many Muslim girls and I think totally different. I saw many girls who seemed happy and proud of themselves.
So, that’s it.
Sorry about my bad english…

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Anonymous

I’m brazilian, from german an arab descent, and particularly find your religion very interesting.

To me, as a non-muslim, this discussion sounds about personal beliefs, and so I think people shouldn’t bother themselves with others that look different. I try not to.

for instance, people tend to think that in Brazil every person is promiscuous and indecent. Totally untrue.

But I thought it was quite interesting when u said that muslims tend to be more critical about hijab then non-muslims.

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Tasneem

I live in South Africa and was brought up in a western society but attended Muslim school earlier in my life, I am 22 years old and a married woman. I would love to wear hijaab,and in my country we are allowed to do so freely without being ridiculed. I thought I would be wearing hijaab once I got married but its not so,I love fashion and clothing and I know that wearing hijaab can be fashionable but I struggle to wear it. I work in the hospitality industry and we are only allowed to wear our uniform which is tight and body hugging. People my age hardly wear hijaab in SA but most of us come from strict Islamic backgrounds.
I think, including myself, that we really do want to but something is holding us back. Inshallah, the Almighty will give us that courage to cover up and become better muslim Inshallah

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Muslima

Assalamu Aleykum
I am 12 years old and wear the hijab. I live in Florida, USA. You Might think I am young to understand this, but i understand this perfectly. I Agree, because there are many muslims who are embarresed to go outside with their hijab and to have everyone stare at you, so they sometimes wear their hijabs in a non proper way to make themselves look cooler. I know it can be hard to have everybody stare at you, but you should not abuse your hijab. if people stare let them stare, who cares. If they have bad thoughts or if they harrass you in public or wherever then it is only bad for them, allah will punish them for their cruel ways. All we have to do as true muslims is to stay just and courageus. Inshallah Allah will help all of us become better muslims.

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Arlene

I have been wearing hajib for 10 months now. When I first started wearing it, it was people I knew who were actually making fun of me and making crass remarks. One of my other neighbors who is Muslim told them that it was not nice to make fun of me as I had professed my Shahadah and was in fact a Muslim, not someone playing around. Of those friends only a few still talk to me. I live with my daughter now, she is very accepting of my choice, doesn’t mind the hajib, and told me that while she understood that pork is no longer in my diet, she’s not giving up her ham for me. The compromise she made was to eat her pork while I’m at work, and we eat chicken, beef, or turkey when I’m home.

The transition at work was so smooth that it took about 2 months before anyone realized what I had done. In my department there are more Muslims that I first realized. Once they realized I had reverted they started coming up to me and letting me know they are Muslimah’s. Myself and one other wear hajib daily. After they realized I’m Muslim two began to wear it part time, and one keeps her hair in a scarf most of the time, but doesn’t otherwise dress modistly (she has dreadlocks and it’s hard to keep them under wraps but she tires.) My supervisor was taken aback, but once she got over the shock she was very accepting. I have 2 jibabs and wear a lot of long skirts and long sleeve blouses. I have arm “socks” for when I wear my 3/4 sleeve blouses. I have about 20 scarves and abalias plus a variety of underscarves to mix and match. I also wear loose pants on days where I’m out of skirts or not working and just running around the house and neighborhood. I chose to wear hajib and had I been given a choice would have been wearing it all my life. I have always loved long skirts and except for nursing school would not wear any type of dress above my ankles unless cornered and stuffed into it forfully. Now I can wear what I feel most comfortable in, and know that Allah see’s my intentions and understands.

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:)

Congrats and blessings to a fellow convert!

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Asra

I had started wearing a Hijab last year around this time. I didn’t give it much thought, I wasn’t forces either. My sister had started Hijab a couple of days before me and my dad suggested that I start too and gave me a choice if I’d like to wear it. I didn’t give it much thought, I just went to school one day in the middle of the year and I had it on. :) People were were accepting and didn’t mind at all. People asked my questions and I was glad I was able to answer them.

But around this year , one of my friends had taken her Hijab off, and my support was a little weak after on. Not many people wore Hijab and so it was a little bit weird for me. I didn’t feel like I have anything on, I just wore Hijab. But these days, I’ve been doubting me putting it on. Because I am 13, and I’ve been looking for excuses of taking it off, when in my heart, I truly want to keep it on, but I just feel held back for some reason. I decided that I did not want to take my Hijab off, it was too precious and the meaning behind it was truly beautiful, and I had become a better Muslim since I had it on.

But since I know I’m not that ready, I was deciding weather it would be alright, if I take it off for Gym class only, I had done it last year because I had just started but this year I decided to take a chance and be a full time Hijabi, and now I’m not to sure. I need adivce. I had told my friends that I’m taking it off for gym and I’d need support but now I’m not sure. I googled some things and I ended up on here and have been reading all day long. :) I’d like some advice on what to do? Would it be a bad thing if I took it off for gym? I have gotten some acne around my forehead because the hijab in gym class gets to tight, and its really more hotter and my Hijabs are pretty tight, so someone please give me some advice as a sister?

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Muslima

Salam Asra,
you and me are very alike we are about the same age ,i am 12, and i wear the hijab. I know how you feel, for i to go through the same thing. My advise to you is that it is not such a good idea to take your hijab off for gym, because if you do then what is the point of wearing the hijab. You dont have to wear dark colored or tight hijabs as long as it covers your hair and chest. you should try wearing colorful bright hijabs that reflect the sunlight, and you shouldnt wear thick scarves or hijabs, try wearing something nice and thin but not see through. and do not wear your hijab to tight let it loose. I hope this advice helps, please reply if it does.

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Milla

Hello,

I am a non-muslim however I like the Hijab and the idea of wearing modest clothes. Would it be offencive to muslims if I would weare the Hijab?

Thanks

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Muslima

Hi Milla,
Of course it wouldnt be offensive to us (muslims). You should wear the hijab whenever you like, who knows maybe inshallah someday in the future you to will become muslim.
;)

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Asra

Thaaank you Muslima :)

You’re advice is quite helpful <3

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Masha

Hi everyone,

I know I’m late, but I’m a non Muslim/Christian living in the U.S. I rarely cover my hair but I’m thinking about doing it more often and dressing more modestly (more breezy/linen type pants, looser clothing). I’d also like to ask if any one would be offended if I started covering my hair, despite not being Muslim/Orthodox/ect.? (My religion is very liberal & doesn’t focus on dress, it’s just a more comfortable way of dressing for me)

Assalamu Aleykum everyone!

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:)

If you want to dress more modestly and cover your hair—so do it! Mashallah.
You just need to be prepared to answer questions from strangers and people you know about why you are covering your hair and such.

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nindy

i’ve been wearing hijab on and off since i was in kindergarten, because, just like the topic here, many people, even my bestfriends questioning me about how long will it took until i take it off again . sometimes i came across people statements,,
like how a girl that wearing hijab was prettier without it, and some even say that the girl who wear it not as easy going as they was before ( before they wear hijab ). which i can’t really understand the corelation.

alhamdulilah, the more i understand about hijab, the more i want to wear them permanently without hesitation. gladly, 1 years passes without me even wanting to take it off.

and about being unfashionable and less modern than people who doesnt wear hijab,,i say it depends on the person, whether she likes her hijab to be simple, or fashionable.
for example, miss Hana tajima simpson the fashion blogger or Yuna zarai the singer from malaysia. they’re both wear hijab, fashionably and proud about it. and they socializing well with non muslim and non hijab muslimah. ^O^

(sorry for the poor english)

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Soumaya

Hello,
I am a Muslim woman and I do not wear Hijab, well, not in the regular form most Hijabi women do it. Indeed, I used to dress without being aware of the Islamic teaching on the dress code, but since I started to become, let’s say, more God-conscious in my everyday life, I started questionning my clothing. Well, I don’t want to open a debate on Hijab, it’s really not my point. But I respect the terms fixed in the Qur’an about women’s dressing as I understand them, meaning that I only show of my beauty what is visible, which according to my understanding (and based on a reflection, analysis and investigation) is face, head (including hair, because I think there is nothing more visible in anyone’s body than the hair because it is at the extremity of our body) my upper neck, my feet and my fore-arm. I feel humble and discrete dressing that way. I wear long large clothes and do not wear belts that tighten me and show my curves. I agree with Z’s statement in the sense that this life is just a transition, it’s a core belief to every muslim man and woman, and that clothing is really a superficial matter which we can turn into “ibada” (act of worship) just as we can turn into “itm” (sin) if we choose to follow our earthly desires. However, I also believe that the whole point of dressing God-consciously is more of a spiritual matter than a merely material one, meaning that it is not because women should not attract men that this dress code was taught to us, but so that appearance wouldn’t have such a great importance in our daily lives. In other words, to me, a woman wearing Hijab attractively with much care spent on details has lost the point comparing to a woman who is not necessarily wearing Hijab, but dressed properly and respectfully, and is so discrete in color and way of walking and attitude that nobody notices her. Besides, I believe that there is no specific description of how a woman should dress, and that we are allowed more flexibility than the traditional Hijab that strictly shows face and hands, as the only detailed description of any clothing done by the prophet as I know son far from Sahih Bukhari is that of pilgrims during the Hajj. Anyways, as I said, my point is not to debate on Hijab, it is to share my own view of clothing in a way that pleases God and satisfies the soul in quietness and releases people from matters of fashion, appearance, style… which are truly superficial issues. A clothing which provides self-respect, tranquility, detachment, discretion, and I find such things in the way I dress and which combines many types of clothing, from the desert women “mlehfa” (one piece of cloth to be wrapped around body), to Indian type of long tuniques and large pants, to long and large robes of many types, and a clean and discrete, pondered hair style (mainly attached), partially covered if wanted/needed, no make up except Kohl (which is also traditional in my country), and no cosmetics or perfumes only natural ones (musc, amber, orange blossom, rose, …) as the Prophet (saws) loved perfumes :). I just want to know what you think of my vision of clothing as an act of faith, of spiritual consciousness and social peace and respect, I am curious to see what other Muslim women think about it, because I mostly meet women who do not even want to discuss the thing. So as not to fall into the stereotype of non-veiled Muslim women you’re talking about, I don’t think that Hijab is wrong or insulting, I just see a greater flexibility in it than let’s say, most women do. So please, tell me what you believe. Thanks!

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:)

Salaam Soumaya,

I think your point is very well made. I am a (soon-to-be) convert and I think your concern (time and effort some women spend on being fashionable while being hijabi) is a very valid one for converts. My family does not know that I am going to take shahadah….so it is weird for them to all of the sudden be covering up my body. My “pre-Islamic” self was very fashionable in clothes that revealed much legs and arm and body curves (all though not too much because I wasn’t too revealing!). So in order to keep my parents/family from asking “why i am wearing all that fabric” I have to maintain my level of “fashion sense” while dressing more modestly. If it was up to me–I would wear an abaya everyday! I find them so comfortable! But out side of my community away at college, my family and hometown does not about my ongoing interest and upcoming conversion to Islam. I have already spent much money to by long skirts and dress–and I think that is fine. But what I don’t like is how much time I have spent in recent days trying on my new clothes I bought this summer and imaging how cute I will look and how others will compliment me. I have come to realize that I have a bit of physical vanity that I need to address. I think some other converts might feel as though we need to still dress “cute” while being modest because of the ideas of unattractive Islamic dress (from the Western viewpoint). I think this is something I will struggle with for a while. Because on one hand, I agree that modest dress is to cover your body and to not attract attention b—-but by dressing very attractively (although) covered we are still attracting attention. I am not sure where to go with this :/

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atiqah rakmad

salam.

i’m from malaysia and this country is an islamic country. it doesn’t matter whether you choose to be fashionable in your clothing choices as long as you covered your aurat. here in Malaysia most of the young ladies and women wear fashionable, colourful clothing attires, shawls and others. nothing is a problem as long you feel confident.even when i’m going to class (i went to university), i wear scarf which colour-block my outfits for the day, or wear cardigan with my coloured jeans.i’m happy with my choices and that’s the feeling that you should get without burdening oneself :)

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farha

Assalamualaykum w.b.t everyone,

I’m born muslim and used to wear the hijab when i graduated because ‘everyone at work’ wears them’. I later abandoned the hijab because I didn’t like to feel like being under sacklike clothing all the time, there’s also lack of choice for young people who want varieties…but that was many years ago…I was young and experimenting…I realized that at that time I was enjoying the feeling of being young and being able to choose my own style without thinking of a matching head cover…I wasn’t sexy or sensual, though, and never intended to be, I still have a feeling of modesty but my Iman was not strong enough I guess..

I did remember looking with disdain at women with hijab but it wasn’t because of being muslim…some women look really dishevelled and unpolished, what more with headcovers that are wrongly in place/mismatched….I know it’s bad to look at it that way especially when we must remember that we don the hijab for Allah’s pleasure/divine law…but there must be a measure of pride in ourselves so we appear decent …now I have worn the hijab again, taking great care to look decent too

just my two cents’ worth…my apologies if my post offends anyone, …cheers and salaam again.

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Anonymous

Assalamualaikum w.b.t everyone.

I’m a non-hijabie, born Muslim. I’m not proud of showing off my hair, just a bit ashamed of wearing hijab. Most of the time I wonder why I feel this way. I know it’s obligatory, just like praying 5 times a day (I do pray 5 times a day), but I just can’t seem to make wearing hijab something I would do every time I leave the house. I have few Muslim friends who are ashamed of wearing hijab too. And some Muslim friends who make jokes or being skeptical towards women with hijab. Strangely enough though my non-Muslim friends don’t have any problem with hijabies.

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zweena

im sorry but im annoyed with the converts who keep mentioning that.. once u convert u r a muslim… believe in it and please stop separating your self as a” born as a muslim” to a “convert…” its just a reques.. what do u say girls.. hope im right…

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Alize

I’m from the Bay Area of California, USA. There are loads of women who wear hijab here, and no one seems to have a problem with it. However, I went to a party with my family (we’re Pakistani) to pray and read Quran. When the girls were hanging out in a back room, none of them had hijab on but me, because I had wrapped mine nicely and used pins and a hairband to decorate it…. a nine year old looked at me with her lip curled, dripping with disdain, and said venomously “why are you still wearing your stupid scarf? we don’t have to wear them, we’re inside. take it OFF”. I think a lot of the girls have issues because their parents force it on them without explaining why. There is a lot of negative talk in our community of the “backwards country girls” who chose to wear their duputta wrapped and not draped. I get called “Arab girl” because of my choice to wear it completely. What’s ironic is that if one of the girls wears a short sleeve shirt the others talk about her that she is a “slut”. I hope that someday I will be able to connect with Muslim girls & women in my area who are not ashamed of their hijab!!

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Marissa

I do not wear a hijab as I am not muslim or middle eastern, I’m actually from the caribbean (Puerto Rico) and I was raised Christian. I’m very interested in Islam- a lot about your religion and culture speaks to me and it makes a lot more sense than what I was raised to believe. Anyway- I think hijabs are absolutely beautiful and I wish I could figure out how to wear them. I have a lot of girlfriends, some of which are muslim and wear a hijab every day, and those of us who don’t wear them really like them! We don’t have a problem with them at all. I find it kind of sad when I hear my girl friends complaining about having to wear them because they feel like they don’t “fit in” and they feel like their hijab is actually bringing unwanted attention to them. :-/

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Korie

Hmmm . . as a convert Im not sure that I have heard too much anti-hijab rhetoric from muslims or non muslims. What I can say I have heard a lot of is negative comments from one hijabi to the other in terms of someones hijab not being good enough hijab. It makes me a little sad to see so much of that negativity.

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Suraya

Hi, I’m a very serious Christian, but a lot of my closest friends are Muslims. Sometimes I wear the hijab too and I don’t have a problem with it at all. I think that the negative reactions really depend on where you live in the Western world. Some areas are totally fine with it, mostly diverse urban areas, but I feel sad when I hear about anti Muslim reactions in more rural or less diverse areas.

Personally I love your website and your sense of fashion. To be honest, as a Christian myself, I am often disgusted with how I can’t find anything decent to wear when shopping — the low shirt lines are so ubiquitous and the modest stuff is often just dumpy. That’s why I love your website, you manage to find such cute things that are still modest. Thank you for that.

Have you ever been to Turkey? I went recently and LOVED the fashion sense I saw in Istanbul. There were three groups of people — the secular Western crowd that tended to be less modest, an older Muslim segment that wore more traditional clothes, and then this really cool young urban Muslim segment that wore gorgeous but modest clothes, and yes, the hijab. Typically I saw women wearing really chic blazers or trenchcoats with beautiful skirts and high heeled boots. GORGEOUS colorful scarves in every color and pattern. I bought like twenty five scarves there! Mostly for gifts but I keep making excuses to keep more for myself. :)

Anyway, sorry if I said anything that was inadvertently offensive. I just wanted to say, I’m a fan. Thanks for your website. God bless you.

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Andrea

I have lived in Muslim neighborhoods, have befriended Muslim women, and have a great respect for Muslims. While I am not Muslim, I have enjoyed many discussions with my friends and neighbors and learned a great deal from them. From young women to older women, I have heard an almost unanimous opinion on the hijab- they choose it and prefer it. These women told me that they wore it to adhere to their beliefs, to respect their bodies, and as an outward sign of faith (similar to how a Christian woman might wear a cross necklace). I admire this and find their mindset to be a beautiful thing. I think that non-Muslims that oppose it are showing their own insecurities and ignorance. If a Muslim woman chooses not to wear it, it is her prerogative, as it is her own understanding of her faith. Another thing that I had heard about hijab (please correct me if I’m wrong) is that the term “hijab” refers to the entire modest style of dress, not just the head covering. Is that correct, or did I misinterpret something somewhere. May you be blessed!
Andrea

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sara

Dear friend you are compeletly right. Wearing hijab means to cover the whole body except face and hands but even them must be without any make up or nailpolishes . in fact without anything beautiful which catch other peoples eyes(especially men’s).
in fact Islam ask women to cover thier body to make a more secure society.

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sara

In fact I was born and raised in a believer family but it was me who chose to have hijab. And many times in my life I found it gorgeous and honorable. In fact wearing hijab for me, means I won’t let any man to lay a finger on me and I must confess although I am a very socioable person but I have never had any problem because ofwearing hijab. In fact some women who dislike hijab sometimes said stupid things to me but not ever not a word from men. one of my best experience is about once when I went to hike with chador( vail in english!?) and a young man praised me because of that and better than that it was in SaudiArabia when I was asked if I was American( because of my accent ) and I told that I am Iranian( I wore vail and the shop keeper just could see my eyes!) in a simple word I’m proude of my hijab

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Maryam

I think that people are sometimes ignorant. I mean-i live in the U.S. And to tell you the truth, it can get difficult. People staring at you and such. I don’t want to complain, Alhamdulillah. I love the hijab. I started wearing it last year, and I am 12.

A lot of my friends are too scared to wear the hijab in the public community. It does take a lot of courage to do that. However, it isn’t hard. If you love your religion and if you are strong in faith, your love will overcome the fear.

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JENNIFER

SALAAM ALAKUM, WEARING HIJAB IS WAJIB (ORDAINED BY ALLAH) AS STATED IN SURAH NUR AND SURAH AHZAB OF THE HOLY QURAN. MAY ALLAH HELP US AND GUIDE US ON THE ENLIGHTENED PATH OF ELEVATED UNDERSTANDING. MAY ALLAH HELP US IN OUR QUEST TO BECOME MUAMINEENS- (YA ALIM, YA HAKIM, YA NUR, YA SABUR, YA RASHID, YA HADI, YA MUMIN)

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nihad

i believe that if you are a muslim you should look like a moslim! i have been wairing hijab since i was 10 and i have allways loved it and respected it ! when you are wairing hijab you represnt all of the moslim girls in the world so you have a big responsability and you shouldnt say anything bad about it because its a fard and you have to do it and love it like prayer or fasting and i agree with you that most of the people saying bad things about hijab are moslims who are not brave enough to make a statement and wair it so they make excuses,however , there are people who respect it such as you and me so there is still hope .
Algeria

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Aina

Salam,

Reading all the comments on trials the women face about wearing the hijab (from Muslims or non-Muslims) made me teary. Living in a Muslim-majority country (Malaysia) where the hijab is a norm, has made me take it for granted. Now I know that Allah SWT has blessed me and the citizens of Malaysia with the opportunity to practice this aspect of Islam without fear and discrimination. Alhamdulillah. To sisters who are facing problems, stand strong and know that we’re all supporting you!

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Aisha

As-salam alaikum fellow sisters in Islam,

This is my story: I’m a 19-year-old college student studying here in the U.S. When I first came here from Saudi Arabia( I was born and raised there), I did not wear the hijab for a semester. Simply put, I was scared. I was scared after reading that a muslim woman was killed for no reason other than that she had a scarf on her head; scared about the kind of treatment I would receive. But Alhamdulillah, after seeing hijabi girls in my university, I thought to myself that this is who I am, and that this is something that I NEEDED to do. Alhamdulillah I started wearing it the next semester right on Eid Day.
The reactions: Sure, there are the looks, none of them hostile and what not, but just a curious look. No verbal abuse. BUT it is definitely a challenge in the classroom, and especially with the professor. Because you are there to learn, you are there for that education, for that knowledge. You have to make an extra effort to the professor so that they don’t think negatively of you. and Alhamdulillah so far none of my professors have any especially “ill” feelings towards me~ I just want to make it known that the challenges are subtle. With that being said, however, the challenges are given to us by Allah (Subhanahu wa Ta’ala), and He is testing us to see if we pass with flying colors. I am grateful for them. May Allah(SWT) always keep us on the Right Path, and may He give us the strength to get through each day, and may He be pleased with our efforts~

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Amina

I am from South Africa the problem here with hijaab is,they say it is too hot or it let them look pious or they look like old ladies or the boys can’t see there hair.The non muslims I don’t think they have a problem,they admire you when you have on hijaab.They respect you.I think mothers has to let there daughters wear from small and them why they must wear hijaab.

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Leila

I think it’s a matter of society class and education. There are “Neo-rich-people”, that includes the muslim women who have a problem with hijab. There are well-educated Muslimas without Hijab who accept that other wear the hijab. Actually, it depends also on the family background. Some families fled from regimes or other countries to be free in a way they dreamed of. When they see a woman in Hijab in Europe for example, they can’t understand it because for them, it’s the sign of something they associate with the bad experiences they had been confronted.

Most of them who do not like the hijab, had many reminds of it as a bad symbol. Surely, for us ”Hijabis”, it isn’t, probably. But we have to be nice, caring and understanding to them because only with a good attitude we can show them that the hijab is not misused everywhere.

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parveen

so nice

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Khawater

I’m not sure because I am the only Muslim girl who even wears hijab in my city (that I’ve seen anyways) and I get tons of stares. Seriously. TONS. I live in Oregon in the USA. I stick out because I wear it, but when I see others who are barely wearing anything but feel “normal”, I think “Alhamdullilah, God gave us a religion telling us to cover up so we feel accepted when we do and don’t end up like that.” No offense to anyone. I have asked a Muslim girl in one of my classes about why she doesn’t and she said it was because she was Indian. Makes no sense but ok, do what you want. And another girl who isn’t Muslim was saying that she totally would if she had to because she thought it looked cute. There we go, that’s what I’m talking about!
But oh well, that’s America, especially in high school, lol.

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Olla

Alhamdulillah….praise to ALlah that in my country, Indonesia, women or girls wearing hijab commonly coz of their awareness. There is no such pressures from the community or the govt. Hijab has becoming popular style since last decade . It is interesting, coz the growing numbers of hijabers especially among young women. We find it is something new to enrich our traditional dress. Not only young women….many designers has also been inspired by hijab n muslim dress style….

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Colleen

I am an American Muslim convert living in SE Asia. I don’t wear hijab for a few reasons. One, I just don’t care for the look. I like scarves and stoles, but I look like a Chupa Chup or a tick about to pop as soon as I try to put anything on my head. It isn’t flattering. Second, as I converted after marriage, my husband is non-Muslim, so me wearing anything distinctively ‘religious’ or ethnic is simply not matching. Thirdly, on principle I do not like visible expressions of my religion. My religion is my business, and I don’t want it to be the first thing someone thinks of when they see me. There is a LOT more to me than being a muslimah. I am also Western, and there are many other ways to be dress modestly and Western without bothering with a headscarf.

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surrina

I’m gonna be 100% honest here, I don’t wear hijab and I’m not gonna blame anyone for my own mistake.. I just don’t have much support from my parents or friends.. I tried being muhjaba about 3 times now but I always fail.. I was born in Chicago but raised in Sudan, it’s this place in Africa that’s basically suppose to be a religious place but it’s not really.. but we should stop caring what other people think cause we are our own ticket to jannah :) From this day forward you can call me a hijabi..

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hamna

I agree with you, because when I started wearing the hijab abot a year ago, my parents, especially my dad, discouraged mthat it’s so e from wearing it, though indirectly. I think that it’s so that Canadians(we live in Canada) will not see him as opressive in a wy that the media shows muslim fathers to be.

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juliette

I am a hispanic woman living in the USA and I want all of the hijabi wearers out there to know that I respect you ladies for having such strong beliefs. I don’t personally know many muslims and would really love to meet some, but from what I know I think that your religion is very beautiful. I know it isn’t polite to stare but I really want you all to know that most of the time why people look at you hijabi wearers it isn’t to judge you, it is because we admire your beauty and well we’re curious to know more.

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Farnella

Thanks. I totally agree, hijab is beautiful! I don’t wear it, but I find it stunning. :3

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Farnella

I am a Muslim. I do not wear hijab. BUT I do admire the hijab very much – I think hijab is an absolutely beautiful way of dressing up and being modest. It’s true that more Muslim women have problems with the hijab than non- Muslims… it’s quite sad, to be honest. Just because I don’t wear hijab doesn’t mean I cannot like the hijab, right? I REALLY like the hijab. I just don’t wear it because when we start wearing something, well, it comes from belief. I’m not saying I don’t have faith – I’m just saying I won’t wear the hijab unless and until I strongly feel the urge to wear it.

I do this because I like being myself – just because other girls wear make up and high heels doesn’t mean I must do the same, right?

And love for Allah comes from within. That is that. :)

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Farnella

P.S: Different people have different ways of showing love towards God. Some do it through hijabs, some through prayers, some through helping others and some by being wise. And all ways of loving Allah is beautiful, including the hijab. :)

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