My Hijab Is Making Me Bald!

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by WE LOVE HIJAB · 109 comments

[Note: With this article I am trying to show that wearing hijab in and of itself will not cause hair loss. If you experience hair loss or breakage upon starting to wear hijab, there are underlying reasons (as listed below) that cause your hair loss and breakage. Please also see the comments to this post for more information and tips from other readers. And by all means, do not let this post scare you away from wearing hijab. Sometimes we might think that wearing hijab gives us an excuse to be lazy with our hair, but we have to take care of it whether the world sees it or not.]

“HIJAB IS MAKING ME BALD!”
Over the years, I have heard of Muslim women not wearing hijab because they say that wearing hijabs makes their hair fall out. If you’re experiencing this issue, there are two things that I could think of that may be causing your seemingly-hijab-induced hair loss. Read on to find out what they are and what you can do about them.

1. Your hijab is too tight.
Your scarf does not need to be locked down like a maximum security prison! A too-tight hijab can not only cause you to lose hair around the front and back of your head, but it can also cause major headaches. To resolve this issue, you could try wearing a bigger underscarf (some of those tiny ones don’t work so well with thicker heads of hair). You could also loosen your hijab and/or wear hijabs that are a bit stretchy. Your hair and head will thank you for it!

2. Your hair is too dry.
When dry hair rubs up against fabrics like the ones that you’ll find in most hijabs, the hair can break off from the friction. To resolve this issue, I have three suggestions for you…

i) Keep your hair well-moisturized by using an oil like coconut oil (olive oil and most other oils will not moisturize your hair; they will just sit on top of your hair without penetrating it). Or you could use a moisturizing conditioner like V05 Moisture Milks Moisturizing Conditioner (this is what I use on my hair and I love it!), just be sure to leave the conditioner in your hair and do not rinse it out.

ii) If your hair is long enough, be sure to keep the ends of your hair tucked in and away from the fabric of your scarf. This can be accomplished by wearing your hair in a bun, a french roll, braids, or a similar style under your scarf.

iii) Only wear smooth, silk scarves for hijabs. Hijabs made out of silk will not cause friction with your hair and thus your hair will be less likely to break and fall out.

Now, tell me: Have you ever experienced this or other beauty-related issues caused by hijab? How did you resolve them?

Leave a Comment

{ 109 comments… read them below or add one }

Meg

I don’t wear hijab, but I cover my hair with scarves. Here’s what I’ve found.

1. If you’re new to hijab–are you sure your hair is thinning? When we wear our hair down, it sheds about 100 strands a day on average. You’ll still shed those strands if you have your hair up and covered, but they’ll only fall out at the end of the day when you brush or wash your hair. This can be quite scary.

2. Check your ponytail or bun–is it too tight? Sometimes, tight braids or ponytails can cause breakage. Only tie back your hair when it is completely dry, otherwise, the wet strands are more prone to stretch and snap.

3. Cotton bonnet-style underscarves, I find, do a lot to reduce damage. I actually find that cotton knit is gentler on my hair than anything else.

Finally, hair loss can be a sign of medical problems. If you really are losing your hair and can’t find a reason, you should talk to your doctor.

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Michelle / Yara

I don’t necessarily think it is hair ‘falling out’, I think its just an accumulation of hair that should fall out throughout the day.

E.g. girls who dont cover their hair, would lose it out and about throughout their day.

But Muslimahs would see a great amount at any one time when taking the hijab off if shes had it on all day, because I know i do and I have really thick hair.
Plus if i’m at work then come in the house I sometimes have to leave it on as my brother in law is staying with us.
So it’s on for a pretty long time …and i’m not bald ..yet! ;)

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Umm Hazim

As salaamu alaykum waramatullahi wabarakatuh,

I have to admit, I’ve never heard of a sister complain of her hair falling out due to wearing hijab! This is all news to me, insha’Allah. I admit I once complained that my hair felt dry as a result of wearing a hijab, but a sister who worked as a cosmetologist told me that the hijab wasn’t causing the dryness, but that it was my lack of keeping my hair hydrated (i.e. moisturized/conditioned) that caused the dryness, hence the brittleness. You know what? She was right, masha’Allah. ; )

~Ma salaam

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Frenchie

sorry in advance for my poor english,
i’m wearing hijab since 1 month more or less, and completely (at work) since 2 weeks, and i have just notice that the front of my head begin to fall out…
i don’t know if it’is hijab consequence or other but by learn this post i’m anxious.
(i reassure you, even if i become bald, I shall remove under no excuse my hijab inshallah)
Best for me would be to apply since today these advice…

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Sakeena

I had this problem before because of the type of hair I have.
So I wear silk underscarves, so that I can wear any kind of scarf on top of it.
I have seen some sisters just wrap the hijab on their head and go, I dont think it’s healthy for the hair. Espcially for some sisters who are African- American.
I also sleep with a silk cap, to protect my hair.

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Hafsa

I’d add to Sr. Kima’s list that maybe you should try a light/smooth natural fibre (silk or light, smooth cotton) instead of synthetics for under or over scarves, which I’ve noticed that besides sometimes impairing your hearing can also cause friction and static electricity that can’t be good for your hair. Plus with naturals your hair and head can breathe.

Also, agree with those sisters who noted that the hair loss might have to do with pulling back your hair all the time.

You can also switch up your hijab style so that you can either wear your hair loose or pinned up instead of banded or ponytailed differently from how you usually do it.

Other thing – for African-American/black sisters. You can consider going natural so that your hair doesn’t have to deal with harsh chemical treatment compounded with hijab or ponytail issues. There are so many beautiful natural options…

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Asiya

Assalaamu Alaikum,

I’ve never heard anyone complain about hijab-hairloss, in fact most sisters I know have beautiful, healthy hair under their hijabs.

Another option for an updo under the hijab is to use a big clip/claw and make sure your ends are tucked in (and use a leave-in moisturizer). Instead of your hair being rubbed against the hijab, it will mainly be your clip. Think Khaleeji-style—and those sisters have great hair, masha’Allah! But be sure to cover all of your hair.

Great Post Kima!

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Tracy

Asalam Alaikum,

I have a different problem. I have never experience hair loss except after giving birth to my daughter. However, I haven’t had my hair cut in over two years. I can’t seem to figure out how and where to have my hair cut. I have naturally curly hair and my head is a mess without my hijab! I knew a sister who cut hair, but she moved away. How do you ladies seem to accomplish a nice hair cut when salons are not accomodating to hijabi ladies? I’ve been wearing hijab for close to four years and my hair is in great condition…it is just too long and out of control.

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Hafsa

Wa alaykum salam Tracy,

You could call around and see if you can book a private appointment (after or before hours) with a female stylist at a salon (best is a place that has at least one private treatment room – so maybe look for a salon that is also a spa and so has those rooms for waxing, massage, etc.)

Higher end places should be willing to accomodate you as they may be used to dealing with VIPs who want privacy.

Costlier option would be asking if the stylist would come to your house. Many are willing to do this, as they do this for weddings when they need to do an entire bridal party – but the rate might be quite high – you never know though until you ask.

Dunno where you live, if it’s in a major metro. area, you could also look on Craigslist for your area under services. Craigslist started with US cities but has since branched out to other countries. There may be a female stylist offering her services there. You can also post anonymously on the site asking for a woman who would be willing to come to you for a reasonable price.

I haven’t had your issue since I don’t have a hairstyle that requires a cut (I trim my ends myself) but I have gone to salon/spas for treatments – I’d add if you go the salon/spa route to remember to wear a style hijab (like al Amirah) that is easy to slip on and off in case despite your best efforts you are interrupted and so you can get started and leave quickly (not stuck fiddling with pins or whatever).

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chocolate

There could be alot of reasons for your hair falling out. Like maybe you need to consume more fiber and vitamins. But alhumdulilah Hijab really protects your hair. I have noticed that if i use a clip to keep my hair up and wear a loose hijab without the under cap it definitly helps me so please try it and see inshallah if it works for you.

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jamila

salamu alakum.
my friend said that my hijab make me bold.
have never happend to me. my hair is aömosy down to my waist. and it is soft. so amybe dry hair is why you go bold???
I use tubhijabs but I have also hijabs like a scarf. but a soft stretch under hijab help to . and it make hijab not glide on your head. I use that under all hijabs. work good.

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Imani

I have never heard of hair flling out either becuse of hijab. I do notice that sisters who are new to hijab do not take care of their hair as much as they would if they did not wear hijab. Also, what I do notice about hijab, personally, is that when I wear my hijab in a fashionable way, like designer Rabia Z, I noticed that my neck has been hurting a lot. I have been seeing a chiropractor for three weeks and was told that wearing my hair wrapped and pulled back was causing my muscles to tense and my spine in the neck to become compressed. He suggested wearing hijab traditionally to reduce too much weight on the head.

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tabu

i have never experienced any serious issues regarding hairloss due 2 hijab, infact by wearing hijab i have noticed that my hair is more silky and hydrated and i have also noticed that my hair grows at a faster rate now then before.

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Shauna Yousef

I only noticed a bit of the “widow’s peak” area breaking off when I didn’t wash my hair with conditioner. I was in Sana’a, Yemen for 5 years when I started wearing Hijab.

I combatted this by using hair masks, wearing the very thin soft balto (or abaya) “makrama’s” for covering my hair.

I agree that it may seem that you have a large amount of hairloss, if you keep your hair tied up and in a hijab all week long (working sisters!) and then brush and wash your hair only to find what seems like gobs of hair.

We loose 5o-100 hairs a day and I it’s long hair it seems like more

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Sara

I recently started wearing Hijab and I LOVE the Cotton bonnet-style underscarves!

The thing is my hair is actually falling out..i wonder if they have anything to do with it?

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Naemah

I just started wearing the Hijab six months ago. Some days I have to wear my Hijab for most of the day so I try to sleep with my hair out on a pillow with a silk cover. I have dread locs ( african american ) and my hair is very thick and growing fast. Since wearing the hijab I have noticed that my hair is more dry than usual. I will try the coconut oil and leave in conditioner once a week. Does anyone else have dread locs and can offer advise?

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Hafsa

Salaams Naemah,

I have natural twists. I find washing or at least wetting my hair more often helps – that’s what I’d read and that’s what I found when I did that. The coconut oil, any oil, cannot actually hydrate, it can only trap moisture that is already there, the only real way to add moisture to your hair is from the outside (washing or wetting it or exposing it to humid weather). Then letting it dry naturally, and adding something (I’m not a big fan of the synthetic conditioners) to keep it moist. I like shea butter and jojoba oil, even warmed olive oil over coconut oil.

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WE LOVE HIJAB

Salam ladies!

If this post is scaring anyone, don’t be scared! :-D I have only heard of a few sisters with this problem and I’ve seen it being brought up in forums online so I decided to write about it. Honestly, I think that some of the people that I personally knew who claimed to have this problem were only using it as a false excuse not to wear hijab (I have some good reasons to believe this), but for those sisters who are really having this issue as some of you have expressed in the comments, hopefully you can try these tips and they should work for you.

As someone else pointed out, we all shed hair everyday. The way that you can tell that your hair has naturally shed (rather than broken off) is by looking at the fallen hair and seeing if there is a tiny white bulb on one end of it. If there is a white bulb on the end, you can be sure that your hair has naturally shed and that your hijab is not causing your hair to fall out.

@Naemah: I know of someone who has very long and well-kept locs and I asked her how she keeps her hair moist. She said that she oils her hair everyday and that she greases her scalp with a light hair grease or cream once a week. She also said that she only shampoos her hair once a week. If you wash your hair more often than that, you may do well to find a natural hair conditioner that you can leave in your hair. Otherwise if I were you, I would definitely use coconut and/or jojoba oils everyday.

@Hafsa: I can’t remember where I read about this, but I read that jojoba oil and coconut oil actually do penetrate and moisturize the hair and that oils like olive oil only seal in the moisture, but they don’t moisturize. I like shea butter too. I had an oil once that was mostly made out of shea butter. I loved it but I can’t find it anywhere. :-(

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Valerie

Salam Alakum,

I do from time to time have hair loss, but I honestly never even blamed it on my wearing hijab. I have 4 young kids, and honestly there are days that I just throw my hair in a ponytail and put hijab on and I’m out the door. I think that my hair loss is just me not taking as good care of it not because of the hijab but thanks for the advice. I am really due for a haircut myself which should help. I got lucky and found a Muslim lady who is a hairstylist in my town. And you know, I’m always telling my non Muslim friends and family that when I have a bad hair day, nobody ever knows.

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Hafsa

re olive oil for hair: at one point I’d read an article by model Wanakee in which she went on about the benefits of olive oil for hair. I think cold olive oil just sits there. Her method involves warming it and that does seem to foster absorption in my experience. Honestly though, I’m busy and I mostly don’t take the time to warm up oil or do spa nights or whatever – so it’s easier for me to use jojoba or shea. I use pure shea butter – they sell it on the street in a lot of places but I bought the one I’m using in the drugstore section of a department store. I don’t like hair pomades because most of them include dubious ingredients like petrolatum (petroleum jelly), dimethicone/silicone oil and sometimes nasty preservatives. I’m much more comfortable using the pure stuff and maybe adding an essential oil to it for scent.

re washing, if you are using something mild and lukewarm or cooler water and letting your hair dry naturally along with something to keep the moisture in, plus clipping your ends you can wash it more often with good results. As I said, for me, the only thing that does really return the moisture to my hair is water – though oils can definitely make your strands feel smoother. But I’m with the sister who said she’s busy and is pretty much a ponytail, throw on hijab kind of sister. I just can’t be pampering in the bathroom all day. I wish I had time for intensive beauty…

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Naemah

Thank you so much sisters, for all that really great advice. In my decision to cover I was worried about the health of my hair but now I’m sure I don’t have to anymore with a little more structure and TLC. I’m excited to try these tips and see how it goes! Thank again :-).

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Maria

my concern with hijab, which surprisingly no one else mentioned, is my forehead is getting broader. and i think it is due to wearing underscarves. any tips please..

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Inal

Salaam ladies,

I wear hijab roughly 14 hours a day due to work and the commute- and what I have seen in my case is that if my hair isn’t properly oiled, and conditioned it gets very brittle and gets caught in the tube cotton under pieces I wear under my hijab (I use the tubes because I hate fiddling with a hijab during the day- it has to stay put; not to mention I feel as if I am calling attention to myself by a constant adjustment motion)…

So in the past few months, on the advice of an Indian friend- I have used an oil called Maka (the market name is Baidyanath Mahabhringraj Oil) by an Ayurvedic company- it really has helped…my hair is softer; thicker and I am seeing less hair caught in the tube than ever before…and I always make sure I don’t put on a hijab with my hair wet nor tied in tight buns.

But I do miss those months I spend in Yemen with my inlaws where up in the mountains in their compound away from prying eyes, I can and do wear less hijab and my hair soaks in some good sun and the vitamin D that comes of it…

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sam

I’ve heard that hair loss as a result of wearing hijab does indeed happen sometimes but usually only happens for the first couple of months, after which it evens out. For myself I find that wearing underscarves stops friction, which in turn helps prevents any more- than- normal hair loss. May Allah reward all of the sisters who are covering their hair to please Him, ameen

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zainab

salam
sorry for my bad english
me i wear hijab for 5 years , then i noticed that my hair fall out , but asking my mother , she told me that this is because of hijab , i told so how can i resolve it , she said by keeping my hair in good health , so she gave me some old recipes of natural products we use for hair , and now i can wear my hijab without any prob and my hair recover like before wearing hijab Alhamdo li Allah
For the products , i know them in arabic , i’ll look for the translation and give them to u and how to make the masks next time inchaallah
Salam

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ons

Hello zaineb I speak Arabic please tell me what is the recipe in Arabic. I don’t need translation. I’m loosing so much hear. I’ve been wearing the hijab for 8 years but I’m almost bald right now. I can’t take off my hijab but I really need something to help

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fullmoonoffaith

What about receeding hairlines? I’m fairly young and I’ve been wearing my khimaar since I was about 12. This problem started happening more and more since I entered university, as well as frequent hair breakage. Does anyone have any idea on how to stop it completely?

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Sara

In response to sisters that are complaining about receding hairline my only advice is to PART YOUR HAIR! it’s nice for a change and it prevents receding hairlines! =)

Can anyone answer my question about cotton style bonnets, can they cause hair loss?

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Ayan

@ sis Sara
I wear the cotton style bonnets underneath my hijab too, and I have not noticed any hair lose. But, if for some reason your hair is still falling out you might want to switch to another material, like silk. Hopefully, everything will work out for you inshAllah.

@ sis Kima question
The only issues I faced once I started to wear the hijab permanently, was that I would make a tight bun and wrapped my hijab tightly. Which gave me minor headaches and ‘hijab’ lines across my forehead and under my chin. Once, I learnt other ways to wear the hijab and leave my hair parted in a loose bun, I no longer had any issues alhamdulillah! :)

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Caramel Complexion

saaalaaam all
I jus wanted to say that its not

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sally

Maria: I have the same problem, the receding hairline. It’s worse where my partition is. I used to wear a band first, to keep the baby hair inside..then a bandana on top, then the hijab. I avoid the bandana now and use loser bands to keep the bangs/baby hair in.
Also, I use to tie my hair in a tight bun. Recently I got a cut and my hair is really short. I don’t notice as much hair falling as before. I wonder if it is because it falls throughout the day (which is normal), like someone mentioned above..so it doesnt accumulate like it did when it was tied on a bum..
I think the hijab does enhance the natural hair loss that women may have, but there are different ways of wearing it to prevent this from happening.

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Christina

i already dont have the greatest hair due to some thyroid/hormone conditions so i dont think wearing a pretty scarf or bandana compounds it too much. if u have healthy hair though dunno why it would fall out. anyways im not hijabi but that is actually one of the main reasons i cover my hair, i just look healthier that way

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Sara

Thanks Ayan =)

Reading everybody’s comments I now wonder what is the IDEAL way to wear the Hijab; i.e. get your hair covered without risking your modesty..is there a way to tie/wrap your hijab loosely, WITHOUT the bandanas OR the bonnets without risking it FALL OFF?!?!?

Please post links to pictures if you have an idea of an IDEAL way to wear hijab.

xx

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Anonymous

Hello! I am not an hijabi yet but I cover my hair with scarves, and I intend to put the hijab in a few monthsInchaAllah.
I have afro hair and I don’t perm it , so I have a biiig head of hair ! To put on my scarve, I have have to tie my hair in a puff ,which is weakening my hairline. I don’t want to end bald !! lol
How can I style my hair to avoid this problem ?
I cannot wear a ‘fro anymore ( I would be too ugly with my future Hijab ) and I’m tired of always braiding my hair ! (sorry for my broken english lol )

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Hafsa

I posted before. I have natural twists – a bit less work than braids and have had small twists and also larger ones. I’ve also done Bantu knots before.

I usually pull my twists back into two ponytails under the hijab or create a bun in the back with a ponytail holder and then use another larger ponytail holder to secure the rest of the hair in the front to the bun.

I haven’t had any issues with pulling at the hairline or breakage.

I wear some kind of underscarf to keep my head from looking too puffy or lumpy. I’ve also found that it’s worked to use bobby pins to secure the hair at the front and sides but let it be free so that the puffiness is at the top rear of my head (I’ve read where sisters in the Gulf States wear big flowers in their hair under their hijabs for the same effect).

I have also done cornrows or flat twists in the front and loose twists in the back so that when I put on my hijab it is smooth for several inches in the front, if that makes sense.

Lately I’ve also been experimenting with wrap styles over the non-underscarf part of the Amirah hijab (these are the T-shirt fabric tube 2-piece tube hijabs) – so that my neck is covered and the turban style of the wrap means less concern about lumpiness than with some of the sleeker hijab styles.

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Hafsa

There is also the headwrap/turban with a light rectangular hijab over it – again less concern with puffiness or lumpiness.

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African Hijabi

Thank you Hafsa ! Your tips are very useful, I’ll try to apply them Inchallah !

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naptural hijabi

Salam,
Thank you Keemah for this post and for this great website. I stop by regularly. :)
As some said, wearing a cotton underscarf is not really a good idea. this is because the cotton will absorb your hair moisture. I allways try to wear a satin underscarf unstead.
As for styling, I usually do cornrows. It’s kind of boring but my hair is not yet long enough to make a bun. Any suggestions?

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Le-Ann Mariamlelue

Assalamu Alaykum
MashaAllah, you chose an excellent topic to discuss and dealt with it exceptionally well
I don’t think hair loss is a direct result of wearing the hijab when it is done in the way pescribed , Allahu ‘Alam
However, I do admit the scalp tends to get “itchy” when the Hijab is worn for long hours on end and as I live in the Tropics its quite expected. The Hijab does lock in heat and this causes the scalp to sweat however it protects the hair and scalp from harmful direct UV radiation.
My solution? Wash your hair often, at least every other day to keep the scalp clean and healthy. Also try as best as possible to minimise the time you spend in direct sunlight over a time period.
Thank you for this topic and shedding some important insight into it
JazakAllah khair
Regards,
Le-Ann

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Summer

Hi ladies,
I am of a different faith tradition, butI also cover my head. I find that my hair is actually much healthier when I cover it because it’s protected from the elements and I don’t heat style it. I also wear silk or wool coverings most of the time, which won’t absorb natural moisture from your hair like cotton. For conditioner, get jojoba (it’s the closest you can get to the natural oils in your hair) and add a few drops of rosemary essential oil. Massage it into your scalp and brush it well through your dry hair, then wash. You may also try applying shampoo only to your roots–what then rinses through will get your ends clean without drying them out.

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Khalidah

Salaam sisters!

I find this very enlightning because I’m a recent convert and I didn’t know about this! I am planning to wear a hijab soon, and thanks!

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malaak-jayne

S.A.
sisters, i have also herd allot of “hijab makes you loose your hair” too.
i am canadian convert/re-vert, muslimah. i wore hijab since first day and even i noticed hair falling and some of your reasons maybe be why, but all people loose hair daily. i am not sure of the exact number but i do remember its surprisingly high. how is your hair suppose to fall tied up? so taking your hair down you’d notice it because it all comes at once. before Islam hair was always a big thing for me. i took cosmo at school and even i didn’t brush my hair every single day. wearing hijab some may get lazy about it, just tie it up, but brushing hair massages your skin and hair roots which help to grow healthily. think of hair as need tending to as a garden or plants. use conditioners and oils for moister but not all the time because whats good for your hair may not be good for your scalp. whatever work for you is best everyone is different. what i use for me is scalp treatment (literally paint your hair with conditioner from root to tip and apply heat and later rinse), its kinda out dated with all the leave in conditioners today which i use to from time to time. olive oil i find is best, too much chemicals is not good for your hair. spray, dying, gels, heat, allot of junk. olive oil is natural-ish and been used for years.
but take care it can leave you looking greasy if you use too much and its hard to wash out but you can hide it under your hijab for treatment and long treatment.
malaak-jayne@hotmail.com

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Amina

Salam alaikom

I’ve been using hijab for a year. I have noticed that my hair is thicker and stronger than it used to be. I believe this is because of scarf protects hair from pollution, sun and from getting all tangled up during the day. I wear always a cotton under scarf with my hijab. My relatives have noticed my thickened hair and I’ve been getting stunned comments on my hair.

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sunspots1

Nice article.
Even under the crepe, chiffon, polyester or rayon hijabs, wearing an underscarf made of silk will stop friction breakage from wearing the hijab. I have seen alot of very bad hair issues w/hijabis except that they were all self-inflicted

1. not wearing clean hijabs – good rotation (changing for seasons)
2. not having well maintained hair
3. not being particular to what type of hijab suits them.

My hair is dry, relaxed and I do not wear hijab without an underscarf of silk or satin. I have no hair problems and have been in hijab for many years wal-humdulillah.

if you need hair help don’t hesitate to contact me and ask.

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Anonymous

I have noticed 2 things since i have worn hijab (aprox 2 and a half years) 1 my hair is softer and needs to be washed less often. 2 I have neglected my hair. I am married now and have started to think about my appearance. I have quite long hair (read almost sitting on it) and it needs special attention to keep the bottom half from drying out. A sister is actually on her way to cut my hair for me, she went to beauty school before she ever was a muslim. I think inshallah that I will ask her to cut it quite short, so i can start all over from the healthier part of my hair.
It is my opinion that when we constantly rub something against our hair it is bound to have a certain amount of damage, then if we neglect our hair in the first place we are just asking for it. Remember sisters, I am advising myself first, that our bodies have rights upon us, just as does our souls and our families. Give each their right. I cant wait to chop my hair, inshallah!

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dee

Salaam girls. Some of you have noticed that you’ve lost hair since starting university, getting married, or after a major life change–this is normal, and usually has everything to do with getting older. I’ve been wearing hijab since my mid twenties, and am now in my thirties (please no aunty jokes :), so I’m speaking from experience.

Stress, diet, and genetics play a huge part in how your hair behaves. I used to have super thick hair, but once I began my first degree, began thinning out—this was about 5 years before I wore hijab. Looking at my mom and maternal grandmother, I can see why—the women in my family tend to grey much later than most, but our hair thins out first, usually at the front. Hormones from pregnancy will also change your hair.

I find keeping my hair short makes it much more manageable, and reduces the strain that a bun puts on my hair. However, I like short hair, though I keep it long from time to time.

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Baizura

I’ve only recently started wearing hijab, and although I’ve not had any problems of hair thinning, I have however, to date, found three strands of grey hair at the area nearest my temple. I’ve never had grey hair before, I’ve only just turned 27. Anyone know what’s wrong with my scalp?

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Mas

Salaams Sisters

I’ve been wearing the hijab about 5 years ago, my hair has thinned considerably as compared to before i put on hijab. Not sure if its due to age or hijab. I use a hairband and cotton hijab as its cooler for me (I’m from Singapore btw). On reading the various posts, it would seem it contribute to hair loss? How does one apply olive or coconut oil? Just the strands or the scalp as well?

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Rabea

Salams ladies,
I’ve been wearing hijab for ten years now and over the past four years have noticed extreme hair loss at my temples. My OBGYN has had me track my hair loss at the temples and I my hairline is moivng back about 1/4″ – 1/2″ every four-six months. Although I have taken off my bandana under my scarf and no longer tie my hair up, nothing has helped. One doctor has told me that it is the hijab that is making my hair fall out – but I am looking for another way to deal with this situation. I have preferred the style of tying my scarf behind my head, but have started to wear only knit caps or my scarf in front, loosely wrapped around. Now, when I wear my scarf in front a lot of my hair shows because I am not wearing a bandana. And, to prevent my hair from being pulled back when I wear knit caps I also part my hair and some comes out from under the cap.

Please give me suggestions. I have had a difficult time keeping the hijab on lately since most of my family and close friends have taken it off, and my hairloss is only making it harder for me to keep it on!

Thank you so much for the help!

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Khairunnisa

Assalamualaikum Sr.
I’ve just started wearing a hijab, thanks to my loving husband, who’s encouraged me to wear it.

Sr. Rabea, there are a few one piece hijabs available now, which just slip on. They don’t pull on your hair much, and you don’t have to wear a cap or bandana under it. You can try this for a while and see what happens.

Insha Allah this helps.

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Romana

Salam to all!!
I am a muslim and am planning on wearing a hijab starting Ramadaan inshaAllah. My advice to the women worried about hair loss and who think the hijab might have contributed to hair loss, i highly doubt that. Not being a hijabi, you probably think i don’t know what i am talking about but my mother has worn a hijab throughout her life and her hair is mashaAllah really nice. For the women who are balding from the temples, massage olive/almond oil on the area and pray Darood Shareef while you massage it in and inshaAllah your hair will soon grow back another way is to leave your hair down when you are at home and if you don’t wear a hijab at home, part it from the side and pin it loosely to the side. Also for Rabea, it’s your friends Iman that tells them it’s ok remember we all get our own graves and will pay for our own sins so please don’t take off the hijab hope Allah blesses you with beautiful thicker hair. Also, pray for me so I will confidently take on the blessing of hijab!

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khadijah

wow mashallah sis , hehe i was pondering to myself that my hair is really thin now and im sure its my scarf when i just read the heading and was like wow weird hehe thanks for your tips :)

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NM

Assalamu Alaikum sisters. Masha’Allah you have all provided some good tips. May Allah Ta’ala bless you all. Aameen Ya Rab! :-) I have a problem regarding my hair aswell…I have been wearing the hijab for around 8 years now and now my hair has started thinning abit at the front on the right side and some of the scalp is then visible. I am not sure whether this is due to tying my hair up too tightly maybe or other problems but I’m abit worried about it because I don’t want it to thin further as I’m in my mid twenties and not even married yet. Can anyone suggest why this is happening and what I can do? I told my doctor but as he is male, I do not want to show my hair to him. JazakumAllahu Khairan.

Allah Ma3akum

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Hala

actually the olive oil is the most moistourizing oil in the world. ALLAH has given us the privilege to use olive oil – ALLAH swore upon it.

=)

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Laylah

@ Hala: Doesn’t God say that olive trees are blessed? In Surat Al Noor?

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Hala

@ Laylah: yes!! =0)

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iman

salam sisters
I know it is a bit late reading this blog but i was drawn to it because its been 2 years since i started wearing the hijab and my once thick lovely hair is now very thin i couldnt understand why and then i realized it was the hijab. my hair is covered evrey day because i am a career girl so hardly any chance for it to breathe. this concerns me because my husband keep sayin my hair does not look thick and healthy antmore

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Hala

I really think that if you have yaqween in ALLAH’s will and use olive oil all the time on your hair and ask ALLAH then inshALLAH he will bless you. don’t let it get to you though habibi be patient =)

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Zaynah

Assalam Aleikoum sisters

I stumbled upon this site/blog by chance and now I’m so glad I did. Allah’s ways happen for the best, right?

I’m 26, and though I’ve been a Muslim since birth, it’s only 6 months ago that I started wearing Hijab, when my son entered an Islamic primary school and I wanted to do my heritage justice.

I must say that wearing the Hijab (I always wear pashminas in the syle shown here) was a bit hard at first, especially since it gave me hot flushes since we live in the tropics. But now I’ve gotten used to it and I cannot believe how healthier and thicker my hair is. I lost all my hair a few years ago because of chemotherapy after being diagnosed with breast cancer, and it was so hard to let it grow back that I always kept it in a boy-like cut. But with the Hijab I find my hair is growing much faster and is in better shape than it’s ever been! In 6 months it went from a Pob to nearly shoulder-length!

The thing to do maybe is to pamper your hair just like if you weren’t wearing the Hijab and it would be out for all the world to see. When not in Hijab, we want the world to swoon over our thick hair, right? Well, now just think you know you’ve got great hair under the Hijab and Insha’Allah, it’s your husband who gets to see it and often, lol, he goes completely gaga over you because of your lovely hair. But I digress! What I do is I use a shampoo for damaged hair, and use a conditioner on only the ends, or the part just off the scalp. I have greasy hair btw, but I use these products. Then before I dry it, I use a dollop of leave-in conditioner/serum, and I part sections and blow dry the hair with the cool setting on the dryer. Don’t use a brush, coz the brush will make your hair weak. Just dry small sections of hair under a big blow of cool air from the dryer.

I find having such styled hair under the Hijab keeps it in good shape too. Also, in the evening, take the pads of your fingers and gently rub your scalp, front to back. It’s very relaxing and it also releases natural oils. I read in the Sunnah that Prophet Muhammad (SAW) used to rub the pads of his fingers into his hair and on his scalp after every bath, and believe me this really works to provide natural oils to your hair. And also, it’s very relaxing when you’re sitting there at the end of the day and the kids are in bed and you wonder how you got through the day!

Also, try wearing pashmina/larger cloth Hijabs. The way I tie mine is that it is secured on my forehead, the skin of my temples, over my jaw bone and under my chin. My hair is free and loose under it, and it only ‘tugs’ at the skin on your face and under your chin.

Insha’Allah, Allah Ta’ala will hear our plea to continue being Muslimas like the kind He wants us to be.

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Amina Ali

Aslaamo Alikym Sisters, Ramadan Kareem
This was a great article on oiling the hair to keep it moist so it won’t break off. I have a lot of hair breakage. I wash and condition my hair and I use hot oil treatments and deep conditioners. I also use an underscarf as this will help to protect my scarf from hair oils and protect my hair from the getting tangled in the scarf.
Wearing an underscarf also prevents loose hairs from out of your hijab, Insha’Allah.

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nena franks

I live in the United States. I see women who wear the full body things that Muslim women wear which are black and thick.

More than once I have see on very hot days, when the weather here is in the 80 and 90s and extremely humid they have passed out waiting for the bus or when walking around the square.

One woman passed out and her child wandered into traffic.

Also I have seen them get the long robes caught in things, and trip over them, and I’ve seen them caught in the rain and so soaked and wet they are barely able to walk. (this was only once with a local woman who looks to weigh perhaps 400+ pounds and wears very huge robes she would walk a few yards and have to lay down on the sidewalk, I was on my bike and she refused to let me help her, etc her children were too small to help her up)

I think there should be a universal Islamic womens group that stresses how to wear these items as it seems unhealthy and dangerous at times for them to be out and about with them on.

Thank you and it’s very interesting reading all the comments with the various tips and tricks!

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Umm Haleemah

Assallam alaikum.

Just found this blog and I must say it’s really interesting to read. I love the fashion suggestions!

Anyway, about hair loss. I’ve been wearing hijaab since I was twelve and have suffered from hair loss on and off since then. However, it’s interesting to note that the original hair loss was caused by lack of iron. I would strongly advise anyone who suffers from this problem to have a blood test just to check and make sure. Especially young mothers! The problem flared up again during pregnancy (silly iron stores!) and it’s interesting to note that many young mums do lose hair in the months following childbirth.

The only other time my hair has fallen out is when I’ve taken the initiative and dyed it. And I tried to go blonde, so I really stuffed up. It damages the hair a lot, so it has to be conditioned EVERY DAY, but in the passing months it’s repaired itself a bit as it’s growing out. (Am never making that mistake again!)

Currently, my mother-in-law who wears niqab is suffering from hair loss. A diagnosis from the doctor revealed that everything was in order, but she did have a dry scalp. Treating it with olive oil helped her a lot! She told me that the only other time she’d experienced hair loss was when she first started going through menopause.

Anyway, though I’ve just rambled on a bit here I’ll get to my point: it’s not always the hijaab to blame. If you are suffering from hair loss, it’s probably a good idea to check your scalp (too dry?), your hijaab (too much friction?), your stage of life (too hectic or stressful, like all those other new mummies out there?) and with your doctor.

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Aminah Gad

As salaamu alaykum,

1. Do not tie hair into ponytail very tight

2. Use a moisturizing conditioner on your hair. Let hair dry natural, do not use heat on your hair after washing it.

3. The beat advice is to wear a head scarf that is pure silk to prevent lose of hair. Also, Sleep on a pillow with silk covering. Do not apply any cotton fabric directly onto hair.

4. Change your eating habits, drink plenty of water and take vitamins.

All of this will prevent hair loss and re-structure unhealthy hair back to healthy hair.

Salaam

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suzan

alsalmo alikom
i wear my hegab 10 years ago before that i had the most healthy hair since then i had dandroff and i lost most of my hair yes it my not be for all hair types but this is an issue with most sisters that wear higab

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Farisha

I just wanted to let you ladies know, hijab is not the reason that you are losing hair…and if any doctor is telling you that, then your doctor is leading you in the wrong direction. I have been wearing hijab for the past three years and yes I did notice my hair was not as thick as it used to be, but after discussing this situation with my doctor, we came to a simple conclusion. In the past three years, I have obviously gotten older, and with that comes stress from various areas in my life. And along with stress, I can be negligent when it comes to my health and not getting the nutrients I need…so he advised me to start taking women’s multivitamins, eat properly, get adequate amount of rest, drink water, and try to manage my stress in a healthy way by exercising …and this was all information my doctor gave to me. He’s not Muslim, but he’s a great doctor and he told me cloth wrapped on my head is definitely not why I was losing hair. He told me there is not medical information to back that theory up and that God would not punish me for obeying his command…He has a point!

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Leila

Salaams – I just want to add to what Farisha just said masha’allah – she is correct I believe. Hair is already dead – it is only the root which is alive so you need to nourish the rootes with good nutrition as she said and wearing some cloth over your hair will not make you bald!! HOWEVER I would say that if you used to wear your hair loose most of the time before Hijab, it is likely you are now wearing it tied up all the time under your hijab. If you tie your hair too tightly, you put stress on the hair root and that WILL make it fall out. In addition you should not leave the house with wet hair in cold weather as it can make the hair follicles ‘freeze’ and snap off. But don’t tie your hair up tight – have it relaxed and comfortable tied up and not too high on the head and you will placed far less strain on the hair follicle.

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Nor

I have to agree with the above fact a bit. I have oily scalp to start with and it needs to be fully aired and washed daily. When I don a jihab, my scalp would turn into an oil slick at the end of the day and even after washing, the accumulated oil will create dandruffs. These in turn, caused my hair to fall out more.

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Nic

I became Muslim summer of 07′ and was wearing the hijab by Nov 07′. Before that, I was known for my long huge black hair, and I teased it, curled it, blow dryed it, anything you can think of, but it remained thick and stubbornly strong. It has now been a lil more than 2 years since I wore hijab, and everything from the thickness of my hair to the texture has changed. In the past two years I rarely even pull out the dryer or heating products, and never tease or style my hair, so shouldn’t my hair be in better shape instead of worse? I am still young, and haven’t had any children yet. I did some research and what we as hijabis are suffering from is called “Traction Alopecia”, or “Ballerina Baldness”. The Ballerina Baldness name for “Traction Alopecia” came from the large percentage of Ballet dancers who suffered from this condition due to tension caused from excess pulling of their hair into buns for long periods of time. Men of the Siqkh faith are also in the largest percentage due to the “top knots” they have their hair pulled in. I have very long hair, and in order to keep it from sticking out of the bottom of my already long pashmina hijabs, I have to tye it up at the base of my neck, but the daily tying for all hours of the day is not the normal intention when God blessed women with beautiful manes, so the tension pulls from the front portion of your scalp, no matter how loose you tie it, your still pulling on the front of your scalf, and pressing the follicles down with fabrics. This is why we have the “hat head” look when we remove our hijabs at the end of the day. I spend time researching and designing new ways to cover my hair, without placing unnatural tension on hair follicles. I won’t give up till find an answer ladies…when it says God does not wish for following our faith to cause distress, well I believe him, so currently I am searching for a way to relieve this distress from myself, and Inshallah others…without having to stop presenting myself as a religious woman.

Few Proven Medical Facts to Add:
The hair loss is follicle, from the root, not from moisture, oil will soften your hair, but will not assist in hair loss due to root tension.
Yes, pulling your hair back daily and then wrapping fabric around it, (wearing hijab) is exactly why you noticed your hair is thinner since you started wearing it. Lets be truthful about this without trying to scare people, or trying to hide this fact out of fear it makes hijab look unattractive. If you wear it, you probably aren’t one to be thrown off by this obstacle, just stop tying back your hair, wear hijab loosely around your scalp, doing your best to keep it from being exposed.
Take Vitamin D, as well as a separate multi vitamin. We do not get much sun light, and there is nothing you can eat that has the adequete amount of Vitamin D to replenish your system. The multi vitamins for women also contain enough iron and protein to assist in regrowth, Prenatal Multi’s are great as well.

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Muslima

Wow, there are so many posts that I can’t read them all! I have been wearing hijab casually since I was in kindergarten, but I only became officially muhajjaba i.e. “Always covered unless family, kids or girls” a few years back when I entered puberty.

I have uncontrollably long, tangly, curly hair that only behaves itself in braids, so my hair is always braided beneath my hijab. A BIG WARNING; do NOT part your hair slam bang on the middle of your head because this causes your hijab to rub against your scalp and causes hair loss. Part it to the right or left and alternate every couple of weeks or so.

I agree that pulling your hair back in a bun or even a braid at the back of your head gives headaches and hair loss, so I would advise hijabis with thick manes to do two braids and pin them over each other at the back of the head (this is a good option for those who don’t like their hairdo to show beneath a one-piece hijab) or just pin each braid up in that little-girl style.

I like Nic’s advice about vitamins, but I think that hijabis should get sunlight by sitting next to windows that have blinds on them in a manner that brings light in but doesn’t let outsiders see inside the window. In the Middle East and Arab countries, get that sunshine in the courtyard or roof of your house, as long as you’re not in a position where someone can see you from outside/above the house. To other people, have you considered getting thicker windows that are translucent so that plenty of light gets in, but cannot be seen through? Or how about those mirror-type windows, so that indoors the light gets in and you can see out, but outdoors you cannot see in the house?

Sorry for such a rambling post. :)

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Muslima

Dear nena franks,

I really doubt if it’s the black robes they wear that make them so hot, and here’s why. I’m a hijabi living in an African country where temperatures zoom up to 110 degrees Farenheit regularly during most of the year. My grandmother, who’s non-Muslim, wears the very lightest of her light cotton clothing, and still suffers heat rash, fatigue, and complaining of how hot the weather is even in winter. My brothers , who wear t-shirts and shorter clothes than I do, all suffer from prickly heat rash. Now here’s the interesting part…I can easily wear two, three layers no-problemo when I’m going out, and I AM THE ONLY MEMBER OF MY CLOSE FAMILY WHO HAS NEVER SUFFERED FROM THE HEAT. You need something covering you up in the summer to protect you from the sun, and you need something covering you up in winter to protect you from the cold! Easy-peasy.

But I do think that more cultural-based black-robed hijabis have a very bad time because (because of norms in their culture) they don’t get enough exercise and get out enough, and where I live, this is very obvious in the women, especially the older ones.

I’m a big supporter of safe niqab (as in wearing something not so trippable by being able to button it up and walk like a coat), and I like seeing niqabis wearing light or earth toned colors as my aunt does, instead of never-ending BLACK.

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Muslima

Whoops, sorry, nena, I didn’t reply about the rain thing. Yes, that does seem to be a problem. Then again, anyone in a soaked dress is liable to fall over from the weight of it. I think that the solution is for niqabis in rainy areas to carry those fold up umbrellas with them in their bags as well as perhaps wearing less heavy clothing, maybe just abaya with niqab.

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laila

hijab does make your hair fall out!!! i wear hijab…it doesnt bother me much i just find stuff to make my hair stronger and what not.
the main reason for hair loss when wearing the hijab is if you wear it to long! (and i do… sometimes 12 hours!!!!) whenever you can take a break and take it off let your scalp breathe!!!! number two its the lack of sun…..hair is dead cells but it deffinately needs sun to be ‘nourished’ and thus grow. this actually the leading cause of hair loss when it comes to hijab….so just sit in the sun for a half hour everyday…even if its just by a window in your home. it helps a lot.
another thing you can do is to use natural herb oils. certain oils help strength the hair folicales and help hair grow back and what not….you can go online and find the right one. also make sure that the hijab pieces are not to tight.
it shouldnt be an excuse…but it is bothersome…im palestinian and to us our long pretty hair is something we take pride in….. so we look for ways to keep it nice even when wearing hijab! :D:D

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amena

As salaamu alaykum, sisters i started wearing hijab 3months ago and ive notice my hair has started falling out and became extremely thin …

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Fathima

Salaams Sisters,

I’ve found that within the last year, after I started working full time my hair seems to be thinning at the front. The rest of my hair is, alhumdulillah, nice and full. I try to air my hair and keep it open for as long as I can when I’m at home. I believe the thinning is due to my underscarves which are a bit of a snug fit. If I wear anything looser, my hair will slip out during the day and will cause a lot of discomfort. I’m getting married in a month Insha Allah and would really appreciate any tips on how to alleviate the current situation. I know my hair wont grow back full in a month, but even ways to help keep it aired well would be much appreciated!

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Tia Abdullah

Sister Fatima,
Congratulations on getting married, Inshallah your new life will be filled with love, joy, happiness, adn blessings from Allah. Actually, i am not quite sure what you can do to regain your hair in one month however, my husband had the same problem. His hair would fall out like no other, so we talked to our hair speciliest and she said that Nioxin shampoo and conditioner would help. He used it for almost 8 months and we have really seen a huge difference in his hair, after seeing this i started using it and it really helps. Maybe this would help you as well. You can buy this product at any Sally Beauty or Hair salon. It is a bit expensive but worth the price..
Inshallah this helps..

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Sarah

When I first started wearing my hijab my hair DEFINITELY fell out. I have fine hair anway and am of European descent. The hair loss was definitely due to the hijab, but it was the style of hijab that was causing the hair loss. If I wear a bonnet underneath a scarf, my hair falls out and it really damages the condition of my hair.l

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Liikul Nazz

Do u hav any nyc waiz of doin ur hijabz??? oh possibly the age of 15 styles ??

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Stefan Supino

I think your blog is interesting I found it on Yahoo. Definetely will return again! I am very exsiting about learning newstuffHave a good day, Mony

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Firdawsi

Assalamu alaikum,

Olive oil penetrates deep in hair and skin which no other oil is possible of doing so. When consumed it nourishes, cleans and strengthens your organs, your skin and your hair. When you use olive oil for your hair, it will moisturize where it is dry, strengthen wherever is weak and make the hairroots stronger, which eventually prevents hairloss. Olive oil can be used for many benefits.

”Allah is the Light of the heavens and the earth. The example of His light is like a niche within which is a lamp, the lamp is within glass, the glass as if it were a pearly [white] star lit from [the oil of] a blessed olive tree, neither of the east nor of the west, whose oil would almost glow even if untouched by fire. Light upon light. Allah guides to His light whom He wills. And Allah presents examples for the people, and Allah is Knowing of all things.”(Quran, Surat An-nur, 24:35)

”It is He who sends down rain from the sky; from it is drink and from it is foliage in which you pasture. He causes to grow for you thereby the crops, OLIVES, palm trees, grapevines, and from all the fruits. Indeed in that is a sign for a people who give thought.” (Quran, Surat An-Nahl, 16:10 and 16:11)

This is stated in the Quran. One should rather refer to the Quran instead of articles written by writers of magazines, books or even scientists. It’s better to be informed before stating anything and nothing can be better informing then the Quran. I would like to ask you to search this up, olive oil surely is good for the human in many ways.

Insyallah, keep healthy and happy

Firdawsi.

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Judith

I have not noticed that covering my hair interferes with hair growth or hair health. To the contrary, in fact, my hair grows longer, thicker, and more attractive now that I am covering it than when I ever wore it uncovered. I think it’s for many reasons. First, my hair doesn’t get damage from sun, grit that is blown around in the wind, or tangles from getting blown around in the wind.

Second, because I am covering it, I never have to do things to my hair that will damage it, just for the sake of style. I don’t use a blow dryer, styling wand, flat-iron, hairspray, mousse, or color. The only products I use now are natural shampoos and conditioners, and once a week I put an extra moisturizing mask on my hair before washing, to give it a little more help. (Also, not spending all the money on hair products means that I can buy fewer, but better quality, products — and more scarves!)

I do uncover my hair at home all the time, since I have no male relatives at all, and I don’t have male non-relatives over, ever. Fortunately my windows don’t face the building next to me, so I can get a little sunshine and fresh air into the apartment and on my hair and skin. Speaking of that, people who dress modestly, such as observant Muslimas like yourselves and observant Jews like me, we often have Vitamin D deficiency because we don’t get enough sunshine on our skin. If you can find a women-only beach or sunning area that will help, but you should also take a Vitamin D supplement, for your health.

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Asmeen

As salaama.
My hair use to fall put in the back because I would tie it too tightly. Now Alhumdulilah my hair has grown back in fully and I have changed the way And the best part is that the app is free!I wear my hijab. Now I either wrap it as to cover my hair and neck or tie it loosely. May Allah ( swt) bless us for our sincere efforts to cover and may He shower us in His bounty and mercy, Amin.

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Asmeen

As salaama.
My hair use to fall Out in the back because I would tie it too tightly. Now Alhumdulilah my hair has grown back in fully and I have changed the way I wear my hijab. Now I either wrap it as to cover my hair and neck or tie it loosely. May Allah (swt) bless us for our sincere efforts to cover and may He shower us in His bounty and mercy, Amin.

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Anonymous

For African Americans it is very important to keep our hair moisturized. I would appreciate any tips for maintaining this practice while at the same time avoiding staining the scarf from the moisturizer/oils.

Thanks.

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omaima

asalamo alaikoum

i apologize for this intervention but in my view i see that the causes of bald has no relation with hi-jab and there’s no doubt about it
maybe a coincidence collected between hi-jab and bald but it’s certainly a coincidence
please veiled sister don’t let this ideas control you it’s only the whispers of Satan he wants to remove the veil in any way for your head
I’ve never heard that there’s someone has hair problémes and he think that the hi-jab is the cause
you must not have any doubt about your hi-jab my sister and don’t let any brobléme make you think like that and don’t never ..never remove the hi-jab for your head sister

……If you are a believer in Allah and His Messenger…… were also a believer in the veil

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omaima

i apologize for this intervention but in my view i see that the causes of bald has no relation
with hijab and there’s is no doubt about it
maybe a coincidence collected between hijab and bald but it’s certainly a coincidence
Please veiled sister don’t let this ideas control you It’s only the whispers of Satan he Wants to remove the veil in any way for your head
i’ve never heard that there is someone has hair problémes and he think that the hijab is the cause
you must not have any doubt about your hijab and don’t let any probléme make you doubt about your hijab

……if you are a believers of allah and his messenger…….you must be a believer of hijab

thank you

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muhammed

where can i get hijab ? i wnt strt a business ?pls help me

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omaima

exusme i don’t understand you are a boy what kind of hijab you mean ??

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Andy Dray

The reason why muslim women are experiencing problems & will continue to experience problems wearing the hijab because It Is a man man prescription. It Is NOT from God.

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Rena Graham

There are lots of reasons why people are experiencing hair loss or baldness, and the most common to that is the genetic factor. Have you look into your family background? or maybe wearing hijab, its more like wearing a cap which could also lead to hair loss and baldness.

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Shehzana

?????? ?????
@ Tracy: try to find local mobile hair dressers, this is what I do for mine n my daughters hair cut, she comes to my house.
I m facing hairloss problem too but i m not sure wether its because of scarf or not. But i agree with keeping hair well moistured and keep them loose under the scarf might help.

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Janan

When I began wearing hijab I remember my first experience on an extremely hot day. Initially I felt a little warmer but as the days wore on that summer my body became climatized to my new clothing and I eventually adjusted. There were even times where the glaring sun seemed to be bothersome to others while it had no impact on me since my clothing protected me from that. No one is going to die from becoming a little hot but skin cancer certainly is killing many. I think in this regard I am better off. As a hijabee I also have the added benefit of my neck, chest, arms and everything else aging at a slower rate since those areas of my body are not exposed to the sun rays~the sun is the #1 ager afterall. Clothing was invented for us to wear, to protect our bodies and to provide us comfort and I feel my modest clothing provides that. I remember the days of growing up a typical American teenager and of course I was trained from an early age that minni skirts were preferable. You know I have never missed the feeling of my bare leggs sticking to the seat of my car or chair on hot days. I never do miss being so bare and all the discomforts that went along with that. I appreciate the comfort of clothing that is not clinging to my shape. I breathe so much easier. Regarding hair loss: from my own reading on the subject it seems to be the norm for women in general to experience hair loss at different times in life. Factors such as stress, illness, the taking of antibiotics to cure colds, the wrong shampoo (too drying) and any allergen can all cause hair loss. In most cases the hair gradually returns and then later on another cyle of hair loss may begin for a variety of reasons.

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muslim786

hey salaams everyone,
im 24 years old and i put my hijab on 5 years ago. i used to have beautiful hair but now its thinned dramatically at the front and u can see my whole scalp:( i think its genetic, but i would never blame my hijab or think its due to that…
i want to ask u all to please please make dua for me… i cant look at myself in the mirror anymore, i look so bad when i come out of the shower cause u can see even more of my scalp, im not married and really worried, all girls wear hijab to hide their beauty, but i feel like i wear it to hide my ugliness
please everyone make dua that Allah returns my hair to me, makes it beautiful and forgives me for my sins, its affecting me soo much :(

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Nadja

As salaama
To help keep your hair soft, managable, and healthy…I recommend “Morracan Oil” products. They may seem pricey, but they last FOREVER…so if you add what you buy in products (weekly/monthly), and then divide the amount and $$ on Morracan Oil products…you find they are cheaper in the long run.

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Alize

I actually really like this style, and think that as long as you don’t do it so much that your neck hurts, or that you’re wearing out the style… Save it for a wedding or something special! I started wearing hijab in the past year; I am the first of the girls in my family to wear hijab all the time, not just during Ramadan or prayer and mosque. I want to use different styles to motivate my younger sister to wear as well, to show her it doesn’t have to be black, plain & boring. We really love this site, and have been experimenting with many different techniques of wrapping and decorating hijab. I feel the cloth does not only hide your hair and body for modesty, but also reminds you and others of your commitment to God. If you do it with a cone head or sparkles or hijab jewelry, then to each her own!

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Alize

Oops, my comment was supposed to be for the other post…. with the cone-head bump!! as for this one, I got something similar to cradle-cap (what babies get?) and it was making my hair fall out. Just last month I got prescription for an anti-fungal shampoo which got rid of it. My doctor said it is very common if you keep your head covered too often, or if you put your hair in your scarf when wet. The humidity under the scarf is perfect for little bacterias to start a party there, and may cause thinning or balding. Ladies, dry your hair before putting on hijab, and make sure to let it get some quality air time every day! I was tying my scarf when my hair was wet because it is very frizzy and was easier to do then…. well, never again! I learned my lesson. An OTC shampoo you can try is Nizoral (I used same thing, but prescription strength), which is apparently prescribed also for hair loss sufferers without infection, due to anti-inflammatory properties. Hope this helps, sisters!

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Zemii

Shalom
I wear also head scarves, one tip is wearing silk under, not too tight, and also a trick is putting vasoline on your hairline so the hair stays moist and the scarf dosent destroy ur hair growth. vasoline is also good to put on ur eyelashes and eyebrows to make the hair grow faster and longer with not so much fall out!!
good lluck

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Rachel

I don’t think that hijab would make one’s hair fall out. I don’t wear hijab, but I wear a Christian headcovering (veil) so my hair is up in a bun and covered all day, I only brush it out when I go to sleep and I put it back up first the in the morning before I go out of my room. The Bible says that her hair is a woman’s glory so it’s nice to think that I’m saving it for someone special (the husband I trust God has for me one day).

Anyway, when I first started wearing the covering about two years ago, my father was very worried about my hair falling out. His thinking was that my grandfather wears a hat all the time and is bald, so therefore the hat was making him bald. He didn’t understand that he wore the hat *because* he was bald. Oh, well. Anyway, my father thought that I had a receding hairline from wearing a headcovering (I started small and wore bandannas and bun-covers for a while, so he could still see my hair at this point…), and couldn’t understand that it was simply because I was brushing my hair back tightly rather than letting it hang loose over my face, thus he was seeing my real hairline for the first time.

But I have noticed that, if anything, my hair has been thicker since I started covering! I think this is because it is protected from wind and sun all day. It also stays nice for longer after washing and I don’t have to wash it as regularly as I did before. I think that if someone is experiencing balding or receding hairline or thinning of hair, it is an underlying issue not related to wearing a headcovering.

I do agree that hair will always fall out when you take the bun down and brush your hair out. Women and girls who wear their hair loose and out all day shed hair everywhere (it’s a little disturbing, actually…) like cats. If it’s up in a bun, it will stay in the bun and when you brush your hair it will get caught in the brush and come out all at once. It’s slightly scary how much comes out! But it’s naturally meant to do that, so don’t worry. However, if you do get huge great clumps coming out, then you should probably be worried…

I know it has been a while since this post was written but I just thought I would put in my opinion on it…

with love and God bless,
from Rachel.

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Heather

Salam aleikum. I began wearing hijab back in November, and I noticed my hair breaking and falling out a LOT more than usual. I’ve worn my hair up in a bun for years — I was in the Army for 5 years, and longer hair must be worn up — and I never had the level of breakage and hair loss I’ve had since I started wearing the scarf. Per a sister’s suggestion, I recently switched from the tube-style cap to the tie-back style — not only is it more comfortable, but it’s easier on my hair, which is already fine and fragile. I will try your tips regarding conditioner, too. Thanks so much!

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Mona

Assalamu aleikum dear Sisters.
I just want to share my experience with the hijab. I started covering my hair 2.5 years ago and I have hairloss ever since undortunately. My hair is in the front thinner and I don’t have much hair in the front. I am very depressed about it. I went to see some specialists cauze I thought it was due to some medical reasons but everything was fine. Therefor it has to be the hijab. Since i am an European Muslim women, not with thick nice hair like most Arabic / Asian women have, it probably effects me more. I be tried evwrything and nothing really works honestly. And b. th. way. All the women that I know from Europe which are covered experience the same problem. Now even if I wanted to take my hijab off, i can’t due to my hair! May Allah inshallah help me and all the women with this problem. And my our sacrifice give us more rewards inshallah. Assalamu aleikum we rrahmwtullullahi we barakatuhu.

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Fayrouz

Hi Mona,
Sorry about the hair. How do you wear your hijab? Do you wear one of those super tight headband caps to keep your hijab in place? If you do, that’s very likely a reason why your hair is thinning. I used to have thinning hair (and I’m Arab…so much for that thick hair, huh?!), and I stopped wearing them and since then, my hair has gotten better. So don’t wear those tight, tight hand cap things!! Try different styles, learn to use pins, etc to keep your hijab right and in its place. It may sound like ‘work’ but it really isn’t.

Also, do you tie your hair in a tight bun or some tight hairstyle with lots of clips and other hair things? That could contribute to it!

Also, give your hair enough attention. If you cover your hair, some people think you don’t need to pay attention to it but that’s not true. Be sure to give your hair the attention it needs.

Good luck!

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Mona

Assalamu Aleikum Sister Fayrouz

Thank you for you’re great solutions. Honestly I did use the caps, but since like 6 months I haven’t use them or rarely for some special occasions. I do use Oils like coconut Oil, Almond Oil and even Amla Oil for my hair. It doesn’t seem to help. I have tried even Verdeso Foam (Special for Hair and it’s really expesive too!) I take Vitamins such as Keratin and Biotin! And PreNatal! I wear my Hijab very loose. And since I am a stay at home mom I don’t have to wear it a lot, and genetically my whole Family has hair. So it is what it is! U can’t undo it now… one thing thou i haven’t tried is shaving my hair???? Can I as a women do that? Perhaps it will help??? Is it allowed in Islam???
Jazakhum Khairum

Salam Aleikum

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safiya

Salam, I am a muslim revert and started wearing hijab in 2007. I am 41 and going through early menopause. I also have depression and anxiety disorder. I have hot flashes and feelings of suffocating..i guess a little claustrophobia. It is very difficult especially in the summer. I kept my hijab on for as long as i could, because I love it and wanted to be closer to Allah, but my condition makes heat untolerable. I still wear long skirts or pants, long shirts..etc..which is hot, but having my head covered made me feel hotter and I became sick. Insha’Allah I will be forgiven, and when I am at a healthier place in my life I will wear it again, insha’Allah.

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HAMEED AHMED

Our Hijabi Haircare’s Covered Hair Shampoo is made specifically for the Hijabi woman. Due to the lack of oxygen under your hijab, the hair tends to get greasy and lack vital nutrients which tend to make your hair break easily. With our carefully selected ingredients which not only tackles greasiness but also helps protect your hair, with pureingredients like Rosemary to stimulate & revitalize your scalp, and pure almond oil to nourish & replenish your hair, which will leave your hair beautifully shiny and healthy. Free from SLES and parabens. For optimum results use in conjunction with Hijabi covered hair Conditioner for women.

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Alia

I am experiencing a terrible hair loss but I am not sure if it is about my “hijab”. 30 years ago I wasn’t wearing it only when I reverted and has never experienced hair loss. I sometimes felt worried about it the moment I am removing my head cover and comb my hair coz there is really a lot of hairs in my comb and in the floors. I have tried a lot of organic solutions, changing conditioners and still my hair is really thinning and the salon advised me to always go for a hair treatment but then it is also very expensive. Then I just trust everything to Allah (swt). He knows best!

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tasha

Ive never had any issues with my hijab

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Kayla

no one ever taught me how to wear a hijab. Maybe Ive been wearing it wrong but I started getting a bald spot in the back. I do wear it tight though. I’m just worried my hair will come out of it.

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Isabella

Salams , I ve been wearing hijab about 3 years now , and I tell u it wasn’t an easy journey ,Alhamdulilyah Allah swt made it easier for me , but these days I ve notices my ends become all damaged and broken and super dry :) and just all my hair become very thin , I stopped colouring it with chemicals and using henna and different conditions and oils lol but nothing really happening , when I m coming home from work my hair all tangled and twisted and I started to get headaches maybe because its very hot at my workplace but Alhamdulilyah Wat else can I do to fix my ends of my hair and I did the treem but I guess I should do more often

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Nudrat

Yes it is TRUE..I used to have very thick bouncy hair before i started practicing Hijab
It is just lately i started wondering if it was due to tight hair band in the under-scarf and then topping it with another tight covering.

It is scientific.So instead of taking the offense please suggest some logical ways to invent a style of wearing loosened slightly comfy way of head cover.Even if we go by the Quran and the Hadidh..the word Hijab is not mentioned and neither is any instance when any of the Islamic Mother or Daughter is forced to tie such a fastened head gear that all her hair is to e pulled back in a bun or ponytail.and then covered with a seamlessly neat clothing..It is but natural this would definitely pull hair and expand the hair cuticle make them weak ,fall and bald.This is very scientific,my forehead was broad now it is even broader since last 5 years of practicing Hijab. It makes me look so beautiful and i feel very covered and comfortable in public but somewhere in my mind I know it is not giving fresh air to my scalp,my hair is oily and Limp and need to be washed everyday because of dampness of sweat.This is a very valid problem.the modern Hijab does make us bald
Let us suggest certain ways and tackle this problem in educated understanding manner.Please.Don’t be offended.I am as much a Muslimah as you all are.But what is True is true.

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Keya

Well , I believe the Hi-jab is the reason my hair is not growing. I just recently started wearing the Hi-jab and my hair is not growing as fast as it used to. After reading this now I know why. I know the amount my hair grows at a time and my hair should be 3-6 inches longer my now but it has only grew 1/2 an inch since I started wearing Hi-jab. Thanks for this article because now I know how to take care of my hair while wearing Hi-jab.

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